The Beaufort Tour of Homes

Sugar and I have always wanted to go on a tour of homes. We finally had a chance to get together and go to the Beaufort Tour of historic homes. We’re only interested on one house in the three day event.

Perhaps you have guessed that it’s one of Sugar’s relatives…

Do you remember Dr. George Mosse Stoney? He had two houses in Beaufort, apparently, and the one became the Sea Island Hotel that was occupied by Federal troops early in the war.

Sugar purchased the tickets, and we got these cool bracelets to wear.

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We practice our fist bump so we can look cool. Clearly we need more practice.

 

We head over to the Riverfront Park, because Lunch, I love you.

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We were too early for lunch so we went to Common Grounds coffee shop.

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We putzed around, enjoying the day, while we waited for Plums to open. I personally like to sit on the patio, as long as it’s not too hot, too cold, too wet, or too dry. I’m easy to please like that.

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We stopped in the art gallery which is housed in Agnes and Daniel Mann’s house. The historical societies call it the Saltus House. We have renamed it the Mann House, and we like to stop in to say hello to Agnes’s walls, floors, and ceilings. (Secretly I have a crush on Agnes Mann.)

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We have to don protective booties before we can walk through the house. Sadly, for us and you fine blog readers, no photography is allowed inside the house. Insurance issues, and privacy issues, and other issue-y stuff like that.

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An old set of steps no longer used that lead from the house to the river.

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Dr. George Mosse Stoney (1795-1854) and Sarah Woodward Barnwell raised six children on this property, which included three outbuildings: a kitchen, a stable, and servants' quarters. This Federal-style home was remodeled in 1838 with a Greek Revival two-story addition facing the river. The Union Army occupied the home in November, 1861 and remained until 1865. It was sold to Austrian emigrant Anne Pollitzer in 1869 and remained in her family for five generations. HISTORIC BEAUFORT FOUNDATION

Dr. George Mosse Stoney (1795-1854) and Sarah Woodward Barnwell raised six children on this property, which included three outbuildings: a kitchen, a stable, and servants’ quarters. This Federal-style home was remodeled in 1838 with a Greek Revival two-story addition facing the river. The Union Army occupied the home in November, 1861 and remained until 1865. It was sold to Austrian emigrant Anne Pollitzer in 1869 and remained in her family for five generations. HISTORIC BEAUFORT FOUNDATION


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Finally! We got it right!

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4 Responses to “The Beaufort Tour of Homes”

  1. Mom Says:

    I just loose it on these tours. I fall in love with the houses and don’t want to leave. Then I go home and give my own four walls dirty looks for days on end 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • ruthrawls Says:

      There were others houses to view, but I had to go to work that afternoon by three. Actually we were disappointed because we were only allowed downstairs which was 4 rooms, an entry, and a hallway. We had to stay with the group so were herded through the spaces. Of course, there was no story about the kitchen At All.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mom Says:

        perhaps I should school you in my ways of stalling the tour guides, holding up the group, sneaking off to ribboned off areas and extracting all the experience I can squeeze out of the “stingy” ones 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  2. ruthrawls Says:

    The stairway had a dummy board blocking the way to the upstairs. And people still live there, not like a museum. But don’t you know we thought about slipping past the blockade.
    There was no speech in the kitchen. The group just filed in and looked around. I was waiting for the docent to talk about the used-to-be kitchen house. Or something. Anything.

    Like

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