Archive for the ‘Historical Issues’ Category

6/7/1891: A Great Fourth of July Celebration to be Held

June 10, 2018

From GenealogyBank: Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 6/7/1891, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VII, Issue 102, Page 8.

LENOIR CITY NOTES.

*****

A Great Fourth of July Celebration to be Held.

LENOIR CITY, JUNE 5.–C. E. Given, of Kansas City, Mo., spent a day this week in our thriving city. Mr. Given has been up the Little Tennessee quietly inspecting the riches hidden there.

Lenoir City is to have an old fashioned Fourth of July celebration. Great preparation is being made to make it an event not to be soon forgotten. Chestnut Hill has been selected as the place to hold the barbecue and display the fireworks in the evening. Home talent and speakers from abroad will split the wind with eloquence. Col. Chas. Stanton is chairman of the committee on arrangements and no pains or money will be spared to make it a grand success.

The belt line railroad to the river has been completed, and the first train will pass over it to-morrow taking to the river the machinery for the large lumber plant.

The Homestead Inn will be ready for occupancy in about ten weeks. It will be beyond doubt one of the best arranged little houses in East Tennessee, and with the attractions possessed in Lenoir, will become  popular summer resort.

Hough and Biedler will have a grand opening Saturday, June 6th. They intend keeping one of the best stocked general stores in this section of the state. They are clever and accommodating gentlemen, and will spare no pains to please their patrons.

Thompson Bros. are erecting a large business block on Broadway. They are the lessees of the large planing mill, also contractors.

The Lenoir City Manufacturing and Lumber company are erecting a large boardinghouse for the accommodation of their employees. It is on the line of the belt road and near their mill site.

Mr. Dempster is straining every nerve to have the flour mill ready to run by the time new wheat is in market. When completed it will be one of the best equipped mills in the state.

Advertisements

May 15, 1892: Billiards and a Bowling Alley in Lenoir City

June 2, 2018

From GenealogyBank: Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 5/5/1892, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VIII, Issue 80, Page 7.

LENOIR CITY BRIEFS.

*****

Big Fourth of July Celebration Being Talked of.

*****

Hill’s Foundry and Machine Shop in Operation–The E. T., V. & G. are to Extend Their Tracks.

*****

LENOIR CITY, TENN., May 14 — [Correspondence.]–The Foundry and Machine shop of F. J. Hill is in operation and is equipped to do all kinds of work in that line. They are now working on a large contract for the Crosby Lumber company. They employ quite a number of skilled mechanics, they with their families will add considerably to our population.

Survey has been made by the E. T. V. & B. R. R., for extending their tracks along the river front for the accommodation of manufacturing industries. The Crosby Lumber company will have a track the entire length of their property, also a tract on the river bank for the accommodation is logging trains. The main river track will extend as far as the Carrin Morsen Lumber company’s property.

The Lenoir City bank is a solid institution, which is evidenced by their semi-annual statement. They organized less than two years. Their first banking house was a log cabin. Now they own and occupy as fine a building as can b found in a city three or four times our size. Their deposits run from twenty-five to thirty-five thousand dollars. Dr. Geo. M. Burdett, the well known secretary and treasurer of the old Lenoir Manufacturing company, is president, and Cass B. Hall is cashier.

Preparations are being made for a grand Fourth of July celebration here this year. The success of last year’s program, which, by the way, was the first fourth ever celebrated here, has encouraged our citizens to make a mighty effort. A basket picnic will be the feature of the day, interspersed with sports, such as foot racing, horse races, boat regrata. Talented orators will deliver addresses. In the evening a display of fire works will be exhibited from the hill tops.

Passenger and freight traffic is steadily on the increase here. Within the past month over fifteen cars of lumber was shipped, ten cars of corn were billed from here, besides several cars of brick. W. H. Stanfeel, agent, here, told THE JOURNAL correspondent that freight receipts for the past month were over $1000.00, while sales for tickets were considerably over $409.00.

The Lenoir City Brick company are running full blast and are employing some thirty men. They are making some large shipments to the Knoxville trade.

The Crosby Lumber company are busily engaged getting material for their new mills. In the meantime they are running the Lenoir City saw mill, and have sawed about 600,000 feet of lumber. They secured two car loads of merchandise this week for their store.

J. W. Thompson has erected a building on his lot on Broadway, which, when finished, will be occupied as a billiard hall and bowling alley.

From five to six hundred pounds of fish are shipped from this point daily.

Our citizens enjoyed an excursion up the Little Tennessee on the steamer Love the first of the week.

Jno. T. Bon & Sons, table manufacturers here, have a large contract with an Indianna firm for making churns for their southern trade.

R. Hanna, proprietor of the woolen mills, was here last week. If that company contemplate a change of location in their plant, this certainly is the point to move to.

There is a street named Bon in East Lenoir City. A few years ago, there was a discussion of social media as to the name. Was it Bon or Bond? I always knew it as Bon. One person argued that there was no such name as Bon and who would name a street BON, so he reasoned it had to be BOND, and someone had just dropped the last consonant. I admit we do tend to drop consonants, and even entire syllables, in East Tennessee, but I was pretty sure that he was wrong. I didn’t actually participate in the discussion, but it stuck in my brain.

I do love a little historical proof to back me up. 🙂

 

Lenoir City: New Enterprises, July 13, 1890

May 13, 2018

From GenealogyBank: Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, July 13, 1890, Volume VI, Issue 138, Page 6.

LENOIR CITY.

*****

New Enterprises–Bank, Lumber Mill.

LENOIR CITY, TENN., July 12.–Lenoir city has started in earnest on her career of progress.

Judge Rodgers and Mr. J. B. Hall, of Loudon, will open a bank here at once.

Messrs. Gorham, Hall and Stanton, of Ionia, Mich., were here yesterday. They will locate a large saw and planing mill. Some idea of the size of their plant may be gained when it is known that their freight bill or its transportation is $1,200.

Col. E. J. Sanford, president and managing director of the Lenoir City company, is having his office painted and nicely furnished.

One hundred hands will commence work on the streets next week.

The prospectus of Lenoir City is in the hands of the printer, and the map is in the hands of the lithographer.

The flour mil is running night and day.

Quite a party of prospectors were here from North Carolina yesterday.

Lenoir City will get there in great shape before the ides of November.

M.

So much news, so little time.

The Church of the United Brethren, 1895

April 24, 2018

I grew up in the Methodist Church.

Ruth Baby Methodist0001

Last year at the 150th anniversary of the church, there were nice memorial books given out. Didn’t go and didn’t get yours? Call the church. They might have more.

Trinity Church 150th anniversary0002Trinity Church 150th anniversary0003

In October 1866 the Holston Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church South appointed Rev. S. K. Haynes as pastor of the Maryville and Lenoir Circuit. Because there was no church building in Lenoir City, known then as Lenoir’s Station, the congregation held services in the Lenoir Carpenter Shop. Earlier services had been held in the river warehouse which belonged to the Lenoirs and still stands today.

In 1870 Lenoir brothers Waighstill Avery, Benjamin Ballard, William, and Israel Pickens built a small frame church near the present corner of Broadway and A Street in downtown Lenoir City.

When the Lenoir family sold their estate in 1890 to the Lenoir City Company, an agreement was reached to relocate the building. The last surviving brother, Benjamin Ballard, agreed to move the church to a site adjacent to the family cemetery near the present site of Calvary Baptist Church. The building remained Lenoir property since it was located on the cemetery property which had been designated as the “Lenoir

Trinity Church 150th anniversary0004

Reservation” in the sale of the estate. By 1893, the church had become a part of the Concord Circuit and the conference appointed S. S. Catron and J. M. Carter as co-pastors so that services could be held each Sunday. The church eventually became a station in 1895 with the Rev. Catron as pastor.

When the Lenoir property was sold to a developer, the company mapped out streets, sold lots, and encouraged and solicited businesses and some industry. People began to move into the area and many of the people began to attend the Lenoir Church. The congregation grew and other denominations established congregations and buildings. The United Brethren organized and began a building program on the corner of C Street and Second Avenue. Being a small group, they realized they could not complete the building program they had begun.

Between 1890 and 1898, the Lenoir Church had outgrown its physical facilities and was considering expansion and building. They entered negotiations with the United Brethren to purchase their partially completed building. Dr. B. B. Lenoir deeded the old church building to the Trustees of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. The trustees were J. R. Browder, S. G. Eldridge, T. C. Foster, G. M. Burdett, and J. W. Harris. The trustees immediately sold their building to the Southern Presbyterian Church and made final purchase of the present site. The deed was recorded December 13, 1898. The building was completed, and the congregation moved in 1899. The church was finished in typical Victorian style with beautiful stained glass windows as its most outstanding feature.

 

From GenealogyBank, 8/21/1895.

Annual Conference United Brethren

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

*****

United Brethren Church Begins at Inskip

This Morning.

The annual conference of the United Brethren in Christ will convene at Inskip, Bookwalter church, Wednesday, August 21st, Bishop J. S. Mills, presiding.

An address of welcome will be given by A. J. Nugent in the evening. Response by the bishop, after which an experience of talk meeting and the sacrament of the Lord’s supper administered.

There will be visiting brethren from Dayton, Ohio. Rev. Dr. McKee, Rev. W. J. Shney, publishing gent and Dr. Kephart, editor of the Religious Telescope, of Dayton, Ohio, will be present also Dr. Bookwalter, of Toledo, Ohio and many others.

There will be basket meetings Saturday and Sunday in the grove. Bishop Mills will preach Sunday morning at 10:30 a. m.

Trains leave Knoxville at 7:45 a. m. and return Sunday morning at 10:30 a. m.

A large crowd is expected from Knoxville.

From GenealogyBank, 8/22/1895, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume XI, Issue 178, Page 5.

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THEIR FIRST CHURCH.

*****

Laying of the Cornerstone of the U.B.

Edifice at Lenoir City.

*****

Notable Occasion in the History of the

Plucky Young city –Large Number

of People Present.

*****

The laying of the corner stone of the United Brethren church, at Lenoir City, yesterday was a notable event in that city. The rain failed to mar the attendance and the exercises in the public school building filled it to overflowing.

The Lenoir City band furnished excellent music and so also did a special choir. The pastor, Dr. W. L. Richardson, presided as master of ceremonies. After reading of scripture, prayer was offered by the Rev. Dwight Marfield, of Dayton, O.

The address of welcome was delivered by Mr. Samuel Marfield. It was full of beautiful sentiment, and was as follows:

The event which we have assembled together to celebrate is one of special significance–which none can better understand and appreciate than we who have stood as guardians at the cradle of this new city, watching with jealous care the early stages of its growth and development. We have had an interesting experience.

The infancy of a city is subject to many of the ills and trials and tribulations which hover about the life of the babe in its nurses’ arms–there are eyeteeth to be cut–into the body politic there is often fed the ingredients of pain and colic, which have to be cast out–as the only relief. The mumps of inordinate expectation have to be reduced with the oil of patience.

The measels of discontent inflamed and visitated by the heat of undue restlessness have to be soothed with the balm of hope–and so I might take you through a very long catalogue of ailments which accompany not only our infant days but those of all newly born towns.

But Lenoir city was one of those phenominal twelve pound babes which are born to health and vigor and growth, and has passed safely beyond the petty ills of its infancy and now–rejoicing in the robust vigor of precocious youth, strong, healthful, buoyant, with hope–proud of its early attainments and confident of its future, greets you all with uncovered head, reverent of teh solemnity of the occasion which as called us together.

In its behalf it is my privilege and great pleasure to address you.

I have spoken of the significance of this event, and had in mind the fact that there is to be laid here to-day the corner stone of the first temple, erected to the glory and service of God since the town was planned and organized. The good men who provided for the religious needs of their families and neighbors and plantation have give us theretofore the only accommodations we have had for churchly purposes.

To-day we witness the beginning of a changed situation and welcome new friends with helping hands and Godly purpose, who have come to plant here in our midst a new vineyard where they may labor for the glory of the master, and to erect a new temple wherein to worship him–and not they only, as I understand it, but you and I and all the people hereabouts.

Good friends, in behalf of my townsmen and neighbors I greet you youfully and welcome you heartily.

“In the name of the Lord we wish you good luck.”

We ask no shibboleth from your lips, but trust of the sacredness of the work you begin, for the loyalty of your efforts to the up-building of the best interests of our community in its spiritual and moral life. I shall be glad if the example you set in planting your church so confidently on a generous and permanent basis may be followed by other branches of the church, Catholic and that this beautiful town with its industrious, intelligent and worthy citizenship may be adorned with many more temples erected to God, where freedom of worship may be enjoyed and which shall be to our people, true resting places for weary hearts, houses of refuge for wayfaring strangers, homes for all, even as pictured by the psalmist, whose soul longing–yes even fainting for the courts of the Lord in a rhapsody described his temple as a place where even the sparrow hath found a home and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, exclaiming joyfully, “Blessed are they that dwell therein.”

Mr. John Dodd, a prominent citizen of Dayton, O., made an address in which he spoke of the value of churches as a home for all Christians, and of its civilizing influence. Dr. Wm. McKee, also of Dayton, made a delightful talk, referring to the building of the tabernacle and the obligations of all taking part in its support.

Dr. Carter, of Chattanooga, made a happy speech, remarking on the beauty of the little city; the wisdom displayed in selecting the church site; the necessity of the church fighting scepticism, especially as it comes to us from foreign immigration.

The pastor made an impressive talk upon the laying of the corner stone. A box containing copies of the Knoxville Journal and Tribune and the Harriman papers, record of the church membership, etc., were placed in a box which was sealed and placed in behind the corner stone, and the exercises closed with benediction by the pastor.

So. Many. Questions. (Sigh)

August 22, 1895, would have been a Thursday. The laying of the cornerstone would have been the day before, the same day the annual conference was announced.

What happened to the United Brethren? I don’t know of a church in Lenoir City that goes by this name. Did they change their name? They seem to have melted away. Was building this church just an unsuccessful venture? Were they a smaller congregation of a larger entity?

Where was the public school building?

And a band? We had our own band in 1890?

But the burning question (insert drum roll):

Where is the box that was sealed and placed behind the cornerstone?

Ah, Lenoir City, you outfox me with your secret mysteries.

 

 

More News From Lenoir City in 1890

April 19, 2018

Lenoir City, Tennessee, makes its way forward in 1890.

From GenealogyBank, Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 8/27/1890, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VI, Issue 183, Page 5.

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LENOIR CITY.

*****

Medicinal Spring Found–The Young

City to Have Water Works.

LENOIR, TENN., August 26.–The camp meeting at the Union camp-grounds, will commence Thursday, August 28th. Great preparations are being made to have this session one of the most interesting ever held. The country for miles around will be represented, and it is hope great good will be accomplished.

The progress the Lenoir City company is making here is quite phenomenal. It is but a month since they commenced operations upon the new town site. In that time about one-half the plat has been put in shape ready for the grading, which we understand will be done at once. Bids are not being received from contractors who make that line of work a business. Investors are coming and indicate their confidence and satisfaction by subscribing stock.

Years ago there existed upon the Lenoir plantation a spring that possessed wonderful medicinal properties. It was a profound secret for a long period; the knowledge of its whereabouts was in the possession of an old colored gentleman. He was considered a sort of magician by the rest of the colored folk on account of the wonderful cures he could perform with simply the use of water. But in a short time his secret, this magnetic spring, was discovered and soon became the general drinking place for all in the neighborhood and for miles around who were in any way troubled with, kidney, stomach, or liver trouble. The water was a splendid appetizer. Dr. Lenoir says that when the mill race was dug the line ran near this spring; the men employed boarded with him; they used this water, and it had the effect of so sharpening their appetites that it worried his always well stocked larder to supply them with enough to eat. Whether from this cause or owing to the war breaking out about this time, the spring was forgotten; the ever washing sands of time soon filled up its sparkling surface.

To-day workman are employed endeavoring to discover that once famous spring, that panacea for all human ills. If they are successful there will be scientific analysis made of its properties Some people are skeptical regarding water cures. They are nature’s medicine. This old darky, whose cures astounded the inhabitants knew no other remedy but this spring of chalybeate water. The Indians had their herbs, their mineral springs which were their remedies. Does this age of medical advance show a heathern people than in the days of our forefathers, when every attic with its bundles of herbs was the doctor shop, and the spring water on the hill side far removed from the contaminating influence of a thickly settled community was their only drink.

Lenoir City will have a system of water works that will far excel anythng of the kind ever put in operation.

Spring water from the adjacent hills will be utalized through a system of pipes that will give the city a sufficient and pure supply of water. No city can enjoy heath with an impure water supply. The ravages of disease, such as typhoid and malarial fevers, are traced directly to impure drinking water. Dr. Foute, a prominent physician here, in conversation with a JOURNAL correspondent said: “In all my practice here, which has been quite extensive, I have never visited a case of well defined typhoid fever, it is wholly unknown in this immediate vicinity, owing, no doubt, to the splendid sanitary condition here, and the purity of the spring water which is universally used.”

*****

From GenealogyBank: Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 10/31/1890, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VI,, Issue 248, Page 6.

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LENOIR CITY NEWS.

*****

A Knoxville Firm Rushing the Street Grading Work.

LENOIR CITY, TENN., October 30.–The planing mill which has been so successfully managed by the Lenoir manufacturing company, has been repaired and put in fine order, and is now under the direction and control of Mease & Thompson, the contractors. They are running six men in the plaining mill, while six or eight are in the finishing department turning out sash, blinds, frames etc.

Contracts were made to-day, by which Lenoir City will have two saw mills. One will be started at once to saw the timber that has been already cut upon the town site, which consists of about one hundred thousand feet of pine timber, besides several thousand feet of oak and chestnut. This timber will be utilized in the construction of houses, which are being delayed for the lack of it.

Boggs & Marston, the enterprising dry goods and grocery men, are doing a rushing business in their line. They employ four clerks, who are kept constantly on the jump. The old Lenoir Manufacturing company controlled a wonderfully large trade, and this new firm is holding the bulk of it. It is surprising the amount of produce that is handled here.

Hall & Hough, of Knoxville, who have the contract for grading the streets, are making rapid progress. Broadway is about completed and is indeed a beautiful thoroughfare. Kingston street will be finished some time next week; three houses are building upon this picturesque avenue. Second and Third avenues, terminating at Magnet Place, one of the prettiest elevations in East Tennessee, have been graded. Every lot on Second avenue, between Hill street and the Magnet, has been sold and six houses are already building.

*****

From GenealogyBank, Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 11/26/1890, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VI, Issue 273, Page 5.

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LENOIR CITY.

*****

Chattanooga Capitalist to Build.

Booms on Little Tennessee River.

Hotel Building–Brick Plant,

Water Supplies, etc.

LENOIR CITY, November 25.–The old machinery in the cotton mill is being taken out and shipped off. It will before long be replaced with other modern machinery, and the hum of turning wheels will soon again be resumed throughout the building.

Work on the building for the new furniture factory is being pushed ahead in earnest. Mr. Bond, the proprietor, is one of those energetic New Yorkers who don’t let the grass grow near him.

The passenger depot building is fast assuming shape and within another week will probably be under roof.

The Chattanooga papers announced last week the chartering of a very large boom company which is to operate on the Little Tennessee. They have a large capital and will soon begin the construction of booms which will extend several miles along the river.

The vastness of the timber territory which is drained by the Little Tennessee and its tributaries is not appreciated by those who have never examined the territory. It is safe to estimate the square miles of virgin timber lands which environ this water way at not less than half a million. The timber on this vast area is an element of wealth which constitutes one of the pillars of strength on which Lenoirs City is building. It has to pass through this gateway before it can reach the other marts of the world, and the manufacturers here will secure it nearest first cost and make their own selections.

Mr. Stanton has his saw mill in position now, and in a day or two the hum of his saws will make music for the valley.

Mr. A. H. Ingemann, of Ohio, spent some time here this week investigating the clays, with a view to locating a large brick making plant. He was so well pleased with the result of his researches and the prospects of the city that before leaving he expressed his determination to locate. He is a thoroughgoing man of business and will be a valuable acquisition to the community.

F. M. Kerr, esq., proprietor of the Deal House, Bucyrus, O., was in town last Monday.

Rev. Dr. J. F. Spence and T. H. Heard, esq., of Knoxville, who are prominent members of the new Lenoir City Hotel company were here last week with their architect Mr. R. Z. Gill examining the site of the new hotel. They expect to erect a first class hostlery with all modern convenience, one special feature being a bath room connection with every guests chamber. There is no point in the state where such excellent water privileges are enjoyed as here.

The luxury of abundant pure water and superior sanitary advantages are secure.

The Lenoirs are shipping seven hundred fat hogs of their own raising from this station.

Mr. and Mrs. Caswell and Miss Helen Page spent a portion of Saturday and Sunday in Knoxville.

The ladies of this city give an entertainment for the benefit of the church next Saturday evening. It promised to be a very pleasant social affair and it is hoped the proceeds will be large.

 

Lenoir City: A Town of the Future

April 15, 2018

I always wondered how we came to live in Lenoir City. How did my family choose to live here? Out of all the places in the world, why Lenoir City? Why Tennessee? Why the South?

When I started poking around the family tree about 20 years ago, I found that both my mother’s and father’s families were here before the United States became the United States. We’ve always been in the South, most particularly in Tennessee and from the feeder states of Virginia and North Carolina, and before that from when those states were Colonies. We’ve been here so long that I don’t have a paper trail that leads back to Europe. I have no clue under what circumstances we got to North America.

And why Lenoir City? I know that my father came to this area looking for work with TVA, and met my mother on a blind date. But how did Mom’s family get to Lenoir City? My best guess is that her parents were textile workers and could find work in the textile mill in Lenoir City. But why did they leave Knoxville? Was it unsafe? Was there no opportunity? Was there not adequate housing?

I suppose I’ll never have answers. I found, however, that I could set the stage in my mind if I knew more about how Lenoir City came to be.

It was a planned city. The old Lenoir Plantation was purchased by a group of investors, and they planned a town complete with town lots, stores, and factories. Fortunately for me, these events were recorded in the Knoxville newspapers. For most towns, their earliest existence was recorded in court records. But Lenoir City was different. It was not the county seat, plus it is one of the youngest counties, so earlier history of the land and people might be found in the parent counties.

In 1890, things started to happen that created Lenoir City.

From GenealogyBank, the Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 8/3/1890, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VI, Issue 159, Page 9.

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LENOIR CITY.

*****

Comprehensive Scheme for Building a

New Town.

Elsewhere will be found the prospectus of Lenoir City, the new city that is to be build on the line of the East Tennessee road, twenty-three miles west of Knoxville. The place is well situated, being on the great railroad mentioned, and also on the Tennessee river. A railroad is being surveyed from that point to a junction with the Walden’s Ridge road, and it will be built just as soon as the survey is complete, thus adding to the advantages already possessed at Lenoir City.

With this road in operation, it will be in effect, a double track road from Knoxville to Clinton. It is just the same distance from Lenoir’s to Clinton by the new road and by way of Knoxville, so that in hauling coal from the coal fields north of us to southern markets, forty-five miles is saved. The empty cars can be hauled by way of Knoxville and the loaded ones to Lenoir, making the Knoxville and Ohio, as above stated, a double-track road to Clinton.

The scheme for organizing and building up the new town is peculiar in that every stockholder becomes also a holder of real estate and a particpiant (sic) in the profits. Every man who purchases stock becomes a partner in the company building the town, and a portion of the money paid in goes to the improvement of his real estate holdings. It is something new in the organization of southern town companies, and is so perfectly clear on the face that everyone understands perfectly when he takes stock just what he is doing. It can not possibly fail of success.

From GenealogyBank, the Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 8/3/1890, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VI, Issue 159, Page 11.

PLANS AND POLICY

*****

Of the Lenoir City Company and

Their Method

*****

Of Selling Stock With Lots, as De-

scribed in their Forthcoming

Prospectus.

*****

Lenoir City is not a “boom town”; it is not the effort of speculators to build upon some old, worn out fields, a mushroom city that cannot withstand future financial storms, and by taking advantage of popular excitement to sell out the lots to outsiders at unreal and fancy prices, and then silently retire from the field, leaving the investors, so to speak, to “hold the bag,” the poorer from their investment in everything except experience.

Not only is Lenoir City situated upon a princely estate, famed throughout the south for its richness and vast expanse, but the founders careful for the success of the enterprise into which they have embarked, have determined to build up a permanent city, established upon sure and staple foundations. They have invested here for time, not for a day, merely.

Having stated out with this determination, they realize the fact, pointed out by reason, that the way to permanently utalize the unexcelled natural advantages of Lenoir City, is to offer this property to the public in such a manner that investments shall be profitable to the investors, and that every investor shall become directly itereated with them in the enterprise, and a zelous and co-operating agent in the up-building of the city.

With this and in view, and with a firm faith in the future of Lenoir City, that makes them willing to depend for their profits upon the future prosperity, they have determined to offer the property to the public upon a mutual plan, and share the profits with all stockholders who now join with them in the enterprise.

The Mutual plan has best solved the problems of insurance companies; it has been the principle that has brought the wonderful success of the building and loan associations, and enable so many of our people now to own houses instead of renting them. It is believed by the founders of Lenoir city that a Mutual plan can work yet greater wonders in the building of a city, and they therefore offer the following plan to the public in the confident belief that it is the most advantageous plan yet offered to those investing in city property, and, therefore, most conducive to the permanent growth of Lenoir City, from which alone they are to receive the reward for their labor and expenditures. They do not claim to have adopted this plan as a matter of philanthropy; it is with them a  matter of business. They wish the purchasers of the property to make money because they know that they will thereby ultimately make more money themselves.

The capital stock of the Lenoir City company has been fixed at eight hundred thousand dollars, ($800,000) in 8,000 shares of $100 each, which is almost precisely three hundred dollars ($300) per acre for the company’s estate, which lies north of the Tennessee river, and on which are the extensive improvements that formerly belonged to the Lenoir Manufacturing company.

One-half of this capital stock (that is $400,000), is to be issued and offered to the public upon the following terms:

A large tract of the land belonging to the company, lying in the center of the locality where the city is to be built has been already laid off in streets and lots, and an accurate map has been made of the entire property showing in detail these streets and lots. These lots have been estimated in value, the valuations being as nearly uniform as possible, after making allowances for the different locations and sizes of the various lots and the uses to which they can be put; the valuations put upon the lots  having been in all cases made as low as possible, and not, it is believed, over one-half of what these same lots would bring at public auction, as the average price per lot will be less that $250 each. The estimated value of each lot offered for sale under this plan has been plainly indicated upon the map itself, copies of which are distributed with this prospectus.

These lots, whose value has been thus estimated, are to be disposed of by the company in connection with the $400,000 of stock. In the following manner: This $400,000 of stock will be sold to the public at par. Every purchaser of this stock will, however, receive not only paid-up stock to the account of his subscription but also a lot (or lots) whose estimated value is equal to the amount of his subscription.

One-half of the amount received for this $400,000 of stock will be placed in the treasury of the company, the other half being used to pay for the original purchase of the property and the debt contracted in the formation of the company. (The founders of the company, it is thus seen, rely for their profits solely upon the value of the remaining stock after this $400,000 has been sold, and after the original purchasers have receive their bonus in lots.) This sum of $200,000 is to be used by the directors of the company for the common benefit of all stockholders as they shall deem for the best interest of the company, either in developing the property by encouraging and aiding manufactures and street improvements, or in dividends to the stockholders.

After the sale of the $400,000 of stock, the stock-books of the company will be closed, and the state of things will then be as follows: The company will have a fully paid up stock of $800,000, will have over 2000 acres of its tract still unsold, consisting of lots and manufacturing sites; and will have $200,000 in its treasury, or in improvements on the property.

It is a simple matter of calculation to ascertain the profit to the purchasers of the above mentioned $400,000 of stock. He then owns a lot (or lots) whose estimated value was $1,000 and which has probably risen in value by that time to $2,000; he furthermore owns $1,000 of paid-up, non-assessable stock in this company, which owns over 2000 acres of the princliest estate in the south, and upon which are extensive improvements, and which, furthermore, has either the sum of $200,000 in its treasury, or the result of its expenditure in the development of the property. If the directors do not use this sum in further developing the remaining property of the company in order to obtain an increased return therefrom, they can, at once, declare a cash-dividend of 25 per cent, on the capital stock. The owner of this $1,000 of stock would then own his $1,000 lot; would have received back $250 of the $1,000 which he spent, leaving his net outlay only $750;and would also own $1,000 of stock in a company owning over 2000 acres lying in and immediately surrounding the most prosperous manufacturing city of the South.

The disposal of this remaining 2,000 acres will be a matter entirely controlled by the wishes of the majority of all the stock-holders. It may be sold at public or private sale, at auction or otherwise, as their judgment may deem best and most profitable. (It will be remembered that the whole estate has been stocked at only about $300 per acre.)

The distinguished feature of this plan is thus seen to be its mutuality and co-operative basis. The founders intend to build up this city upon the principle of the old refrain: “A long, long pull, and a strong, strong pull, and a pull together.” All who aid them in building up this magnificent industrial city will share both in the glory and in the profits of the achievement.

The public which buys the $40,000 of stock to be put on the market will then own one-half of this magnificent estate which is to-day, not to speak of its future as a manufacturing city, worth, for its present intrinsic value alone, at least the entire capital stock of the company.

Details of the Method of Sale.

The books of the company will be opened for the sale and issuance of the $400,00 of stock at 11 o’clock a. m., on Wednesday, September 3, 1890, at Lenoir City. (The company reserve the right to reject all bids in excess of $400,000, as only that amount of stock is to be sold.)

Subscriptions are invited before the above mentioned day, but if made in advance must be accompanied by 10 per cent of the amount of stock subscribed, either in cash or a certified check payable to the order of C. M. McClung, secretary and treasurer of the company. All the subscriptions will be registered in the precise chronological order in which they are received, and in that order will the subscribers be allowed to select their lots.

Stock will be sold at par, and upon the following terms; One-half cash; one-fourth payable in six months; and the remainder in twelve months, with interest from date. Upon making the first cash payment of one-half (of which in case of subscriptions made in advance, the 10 per cent payment already made will be credited as a part), the subscriber of stock will receive a receipt for the amount paid, and after selecting the lot or lots whose estimated value is equal to the amount of his stock subscribed, will receive a written agreement binding the company on the payment of the balance of his subscription, to execute to him a certificate of stock to the full amount thereof and a warranty deed in fee simple, free from all incumbrances, to the lot or lots selected, subject, however, to the liquor forteiture clause herein before stated. The payment of the balance may, of course, if the purchaser desires, be made at anytime before the end of the twelve months, thus enabling him, at once, to receive his certificate of stock and deed to his lot. On the other hand, however, if a subscriber to stock, after paying one half of his subscription, does not wish to continue his payments in order to obtain the lot or lots he has selected, or for any reason ceases making payments when due, the company will issue to him, in full satisfaction of his contract, paid up shares of capital stock of the company to the full amount of the money has has already paid in, fractions of shares not being included.

To Summarize:

This is, in fact, not a sale of lots, but of stock in the company. The founders of the Lenoir City company are not seeking victims; they are inviting associates. The company is not now trying to sell out its property, but rather to increase the numbers of parties interested with the founders in the building up of the city. The efforts of many men are required to build up a city; the founders are, therefore, inviting good citizens to stand with them in the enterprise, to partake of their labors, and share in their profits.

For this purpose they have, put half of the capital stock of the company on the market. In so doing they offer to the purchasing stockholders not only their stock but also lots in the city at opening valuations, which are merely nominal compared with the prices at which such lots are usually sold in new towns. The lots will be offered at these valuations to stockholders only; being, it fact, given to stockholders. Until all this $400,000 of stock is sold and issued no lots can be obtained from the company on any terms except as a bonus with this stock.

The subscribers to this stock will not only obtain this bonus, (thus receiving the full value of their investments), but together with the founders will become owners of the vast tract of land lying in and around these lots, which comprises the great bulk of the property of the company. On the other hand the founders expect them, by the aid of their voices and influence and improvements on the lots, in buildings and manufactures, to give valuable assistance in developing and increasing the value of this remaining property. It is from the sale of this remaining tract of over 2,000 acres, or such part of it as the stockholders may wish to put upon the market, comprising the far greater portion of this “princely estate,” which will probably be sold at public auction late in the fall or early next spring, at greatly advanced prices, that the founders of Lenoir City, by the help o the new stockholders and sharing with them, expect to realize their profits.

Remember than an interest in this Company upon these liberal terms can only be obtained by becoming a purchaser of a porrtion of this $400,000 of stock now offered to the public.

Notice.–Persons desiring further information as to the properties, plans of sale, or other matters concerning the Company, are requested to address the

LENOIR CITY COMPANY,

Lenoir, E. Tenn.

 

*****

From GenealogyBank, Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 8/28/1890, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VI, Issue 184, Page 8.

img_3665

 

LENOIR CITY.

*****

A Building Boom in the New Industrial Town.

****

New Your Stockholder Will Build Cottages — Brick Factory to be Started.

*****

Lenoir, Tenn., August 27, — Quite a stir in financial circles was created here yesterday afternoon, when Mr. Smalley, of the Lenoir City company, received the following instructions from the New York magnates of the concern: “Prospectus and maps received; well pleased with the outlook. We authorize you to sue your own judgment in selecting us each a lot; also assume authority to erect upon each a house, the cost of which will e about $2,000, something attractive and substantial, a good renting property. This instruction from the New York gentlemen namely, Hon. Calvin S. Brice, Col. C. M. McGhee, E. R. Chapman, Esq., John G. Moore, Esq., and Hon. O. H. Payne, adds great weight to the enterprise.True they are all stockholders in the company and have  controlling interest, yet it also indicates positively that this is no paper scheme, an enterprise to work upon outside capital. This knowledge has had its effect; people here who have held aloof, desirous of investing, yet waiting for their neighbor to make the advance, have come to the conclusion that now is the appointed time. It is man’s nature to want the best in everything, that proclivity is demonstrated here, when, after subscribing stock, they hurry to the town site to make the choice of their lots. But here they are puzzled; there is no choice; they sare all desirable. The man blindfolded who shoots an arrow into that beautiful park and then takes up his abode where it falls is as well off and as well-situated as the man who devotes a day in making his selection.

There is one feature that is embarrassing at present; there is no building brick to  be had nearer than Knoxville. A company will immediately go to work here and manufacture three or four hundred yet this fall, but that does not supply the present demand. Mr. Cass Hall of the Lenoir City bank, was compelled to set his house on blocks, leaving the foundation until brick could be procured. It will not take advertising or whole page displays to make this enterprise a success, aside from the advantageous plans upon which the company work, the mutual plan, making the investment profitable to the investors, by every investor becoming directly interested with them in the enterprise, there are mutual advantages that will enhance the value of the property, simply for the reason of its location.

People want comforts in this life, the rich, the poor like. The laboring man wants to live where he can enjoy with his family health and prosperity. What is lacking here to make this one of the greatest manufacturing places in the south: Besides all the mineral wealth beneath the surface and the timber above, nature has been liberal with her gifts in making this one of the richest agricultural regions in Tennessee. The capitalist wants to place his means where the greatest gain can be obtained. Here with the iron, the coal, the timber and marble at our very door, with both river and railroad facilities that cannot be excelled, name the industry that cannot succeed.

Strong men have seen thy face,

And looked thy beauty o’er.

Were dazzled with thine every grace,

They loved thee much LENOIR.

They purchased with a price,

A sum unheard before,

Thy vales and hills and alls that’s nice,

And now they own LENOIR.

And they will see thee grow,

Yes, they will see thee soar,

Beyond the limits now marked out,

Will grow our proud LENOIR.

Then some will come and stand,

And loud their lost deplore;

For not investing in thy land,

When thou wert cheap, LENOIR.

 

From GenealogyBank, Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 9/5/1890, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VI, Issue 192, Page 5.

Big Day at Lenoir City.

The managers of the Lenoir City Company are rejoicing over their well earned success. By the close of the first day of the public sale $60,000 of stock had been subscribed and cash payment made on more than $50,000. Several large blocks will be taken this week.

The work of selling lots with stock will continue, without glaring advertisements, until the remaining $300,000 of stock is sold, after which the company proposes to advertise extensively for the big auction sale next spring.

Plans are now being drawn and contracts made for various handsome buildings, both store and residence, to be erected at once by different stockholders.

Remember that purchasers of this “ground floor” not only get their lots but also share in the future profits of the company. The sooner you buy the better selection of lots you can make.

*****

 

From GenealogyBank, Daily Journal and Journal and Tribune, 9/7/1890, Knoxville, Tennessee, Volume VI, Issue 194, Page 5.

LENOIR CITY.

*****

Things Moving Lively at the New Town.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

LENOIR TENN., September 6.–Mr. James Thompson, from Ohio, arrived in this city last evening. Mr. Thompson is a contractor and architect of state reputation. He will locate at Lenoir. He will submit plans and specifications for the construction of the  five houses that will be immediately built by the New York gentlemen. Every train brings in mechanics of the different trades. The eastern and western building season will soon be over. They are coming to a country where they build the year round.

Mr. Grant B. Chley, of New York, has telegraphed the managers to select him a lot and build thereon a house, something similar to those that will be erected by the New York stockholders.

B. B. Hall of Iona, Mich., arrived this afternoon. Mr. Hall is one of the stock-holders in the large saw milling plant that will locate here at once. They have selected the site, five acres along the banks of the Tennessee river. They have purchased all the timber on the Lenoir City Companies possessions. But their main dependence will be upon the exhaustless supply of timber in the mountains which is tributary to this point.

The E. T. Va., & Ga., railroad have completed the excavation for the new depot also for two miles of side track. The new depot, it is said, will be the finest along the line of road. The estimated cost is $3,000, it will be of the latest designs and a model for convenience.

The collection of minerals, marble and wood being gathered from the Lenoir plantation is assuming respectable proportions under the guidance of Dr. Benson. An interesting cabinet will soon be on exhibition at the office of the company.

*****

Now, I ask you: Who wouldn’t want to live in Lenoir City?

Weakley County, Tennessee County Court Minutes: Luellin Wilkins, 1829

March 14, 2018

Wilkins 1829 Court records0001

Here’s a copy that I have had for almost 20 years of the the Weakley County, Tennessee, County Court Minutes regarding Llewellyn Wilkins. I have straightened the page and outlined the pertinent parts for “Luellin”.

Wilkins 1829 Court records0001

Page 80

William Fitzgerald)     Debt

vs)

John D. Calvert)

This Day came the parties by their attornies and thereupon came a jury of good and lawful men to wit, Benj. Bondurant, Jessie Edmison, Edward Busey, Saml. Morgan, John A.C. Rhoads, John Terrell, William Porch, William Ridgeway, Elijah Stanley, William Willingham, Amasa Parham, & Luellin Wilkins who being duly elected, tried and sworn to the truth to speak, upon the Issue joined, upon their oaths do say that the Defendant is justly indebted to the plaintiff the sum of one hundred and thirty nine Dollars and fifty cents, debt and they do assess his damages to three dollars and ten cents by reason of the detention thereof. It is therefore considered by the court that the Plaintiff recover of the defendant, the aforesaid sum of one hundred and thirty nine Dollars and fifty cents debt, together with the further sum of three dollars and ten cents damages by the jury aforesaid in manner aforesaid, assessed as also his costs, about his suit in this behalf expended &c and that he have execution for the same.

(Issued)

 

Wilkins 1829 Court records0002

Wilkins 1829 Court records0002

Pages 80 and 81

Martin Clayton)     Debt

vs)

Saml. Morgan)

This day came the parties by their attornies and thereupon came a jury of good and lawful men, to wit, Benjamin Bondurant, Jessie Edmison, Edward Busey, John A.C. Rhoads, John Terrell, William Porch, William Ridgeway, Elijah Stanley, William Willingham, Amasa Parham, Luellin Wilkins and John T. Damron who being duly elected, tried and sworn the truth to speak upon the issue joined, upon their oaths, do say that the defendant is justly indebted to the plaintiff the sum of two hundred dollars debt and that they do assess his damages to six Dollars and 45 cents by reason of the detention off sold debt.

It is therefore considered by the court that the plaintiff recover of the Defendant the aforesaid sum of two hundred Dollars debt together with the further sum of six dollars and 45 cents damages by the jury aforesaid in manner aforesaid assessed as also his costs about his suit in this behalf expended and that he have execution for the same &c.

You might have noticed that one of the jurors in the first case becomes the Defendant in the second case. I suspect that this small county was early in its formation, and there were a minimum of “good and lawful men”.

You might wonder why I added both my original copy and my edited copy. You just never know when someone might need an original for their own documentation.

Wilkins from Wake

March 2, 2018

I found this 40-page document that I’ve had for almost 20 years. Doug Marion sent this to me so long ago that I had lost his address. Using the magic of the internet, I found him. He has since emailed me quite a few Wilkins photos that he got from the grandson of a Wilkins. And because I have connected with 2 DNA Wilkins matches, we have shared the photos.

Which leads me to the Wilkins From Wake County. This document was written by Barbara Elaine Clark. It is an unpublished manuscript, and is not to be reproduced without permission. So how am I going to find this unknown person? Yup, the internet. I contacted a 1st cousin that I haven’t seen in 40ish years who lives in the same town as Ms. Clark. Said cousin asked around and came up with a contact person, a name, and a phone number. Ms. Clark is still living and says that I can share. I suppose she might be surprised that someone is interested in a paper she wrote in 1986.

If you are a Wilkins researcher, here are some clues. Read and share!

 

Wilkins of Wake0001Wilkins of Wake0002Wilkins of Wake0003Wilkins of Wake0004Wilkins of Wake0005Wilkins of Wake0006Wilkins of Wake0007Wilkins of Wake0008Wilkins of Wake0009Wilkins of Wake0010Wilkins of Wake0011Wilkins of Wake0012Wilkins of Wake0013Wilkins of Wake0014Wilkins of Wake0015Wilkins of Wake0016Wilkins of Wake0017Wilkins of Wake0018Wilkins of Wake0019Wilkins of Wake0020Wilkins of Wake0021Wilkins of Wake0022Wilkins of Wake0023Wilkins of Wake0024Wilkins of Wake0025Wilkins of Wake0026Wilkins of Wake0027Wilkins of Wake0028Wilkins of Wake0029Wilkins of Wake0030Wilkins of Wake0031Wilkins of Wake0032Wilkins of Wake0033Wilkins of Wake0034Wilkins of Wake0035Wilkins of Wake0036.jpgWilkins of Wake0037.jpgWilkins of Wake0038.jpgWilkins of Wake0039.jpgWilkins of Wake0040.jpg

Grandma’s Bread & Butter Pickles, 1961

February 28, 2018

Grandma made several kinds of pickles. My favorite was the dill, never the sweet. She also made a thing called “Bread & Butter”. I don’t know what Bread & Butter means, but I was not a fan.

That was when I was little. I am a big fan now.

Grandma's Bread & Butter Pickle Recipe 1961 P1

Aug 7, 1961

Bread & butter pickels

12 Med Cucumbers

8 Med onions

2 green pepers

1/2 cup salt

5 cups suar

5 cup vinegar

2 tea spoons mustard seed

tea spoon celry seed

1/2 cloves

1/2 turmeric

Grandma's Bread & Butter Pickle Recipe 1961 P2

2

Wash cumber do not peel

Slise paper thin about 16

cups slise & shred green

peper from which all seed

& pits have been removed

put in big bowl with

sat sprinkled though & ice-

cubs let stand 3 hours

drain quickly, make

a syrup with white sugar

& vinegar Ad all this

& boil 5 minuts

Grandma apparently knew that everyone knew the basics of canning pickles, so she doesn’t bother to go into the details of preparing the jars and lids and of processing the pickles. Even I have a Betty Crocker cookbook and could figure it out.

And there you have it. Go make yourself some pickels.

The 2017 FlowerFest, Part Two

January 15, 2018

We finished up Part One at Bonaventure and Laurel Grove and ran out of time.

So, two days before Christmas, we head to Robertville for Part Two.

This was at the Robertville Baptist Church, which was formerly known as Blackswamp Baptist Church.

BFFC567F-2D9C-4359-AB34-1938A5ADB3CA

The above photo is of the marker for George and Phoebe Mosse that Sugar had installed earlier in 2017.

47E2830F-B68F-4584-92A3-ED0A46BAC6CD

I noticed several markers that were in the next plot on the west side of the Lawton plot.

7DEAB5A1-FABA-4705-83DF-0C0D15086484

BAYNARD POLLOCK

BAYNARD POLLOCK

First son of

Dr. J.S. & Mrs S.C

LAWTON

Died

May 16th 1844

Aged 3 months

& 28 days.

13FF31D2-78AC-4FC0-AF56-A4095A8290F6

CLARENCE GEORGE

CLARENCE GEORGE

Second son of

Dr. J.S. & Mrs S.C.

LAWTON

Died

June 10th 1847

Aged 1 month

& 10 days.

FC6AEDCD-24F1-489C-9608-5944EC781228

Mrs. ESTHER M. HUGHES

IN

Memory of

Mrs. ESTHER M. HUGHES

who died

25th Sept. 1837

Aged 65 yrs. 6 mos. 7ds.

For many years she lived

a useful member of the

Baptist Church,

And died in strong hope

of a blessed immortality.

“Blessed are the dead who

die in the Lord, they rest

from their labors, and

their works do follow

them.”

2F277D68-9BBD-4CB2-91C0-8D8F82E91A0C

We think the last name is ROBERT.

A5799645-622A-4285-B0D3-6ABC9844E1E2

Finished here, and we headed to the Robert Cemetery.

BAA7E66D-8CB3-410B-8CA2-D7B17D61CEE6

The poinsettia is placed across the cemetery between John Robert and his wife Elizabeth Dixon Robert.

3ABA4D75-223C-4FF1-A2CA-7ADBE34E59D4

Chipmunks? Squirrels? leave signs that they were here.

D5A276E6-50A0-4DDA-8FAD-795514DBA3E2

This panorama shot is another skill that I am working on. This is the entire Robert Cemetery.

Annnd we’re done. See you next year!