Medway Plantation in Goose Creek, SC

Medway Plantation

Medway Plantation

“In 1686 Medway Plantation was granted by the Lords Proprietors to Jan Van Aarrsen, seigneur de Weirnhoudt.  In 1689 the property came into the possession of Landgrave Thomas Smith, Governor of South Carolina November 1693 to October 1694.  He died in November 1694 and is buried at Medway.”

On Sunday, September 27, 2009, Sugar and I went on a little day trip to Goose Creek, SC, to see if we could find Medway Plantation.  It had rained buckets most of the night before, and we were concerned that it might deluge again.  But we were determined to get out of town, so we set out, with the plan that we would turn back if the weather got too bad.  We went past the turn-off, even though we had a good map.  The road wasn’t marked, and the properties at the turn-off were industrial with large earth-moving equipment.  Not the type of entryway we were planning on finding.

The photo above is heavily cropped.  Here’s what the historical marker really looks like:

Reality

Reality

I didn’t even mention the railroad track.  So we finally got turned in the right direction.  Further along the road was a neighborhood.  Looked a little rough.  When the houses ended, we saw the sign for Medway Road and knew we were actually on the right track. 

Goldenrod blooming in profusion

Goldenrod blooming in profusion

We drove down the narrow lane, and the “No Trespassing” signs began to appear.  So we stopped.  The property is only 6700 acres, and we didn’t know how far we’d have to trespass before we got to the grand entrance gates.  Something about being taken to a court of law is reason enough to stop moving forward.

The end of the line

The end of the line

No trespassing

No trespassing

“Do not enter looking for dogs.  If we find your dogs we will notify you.  Persons ignoring this notice are trespassing and will be prosecuted.  G.S. Legendre, Owner”

G.S. Legendre was Gertrude Legendre, an amazing woman who lived to be 97.  She lived 70 or so years at Medway.  She has an amazing story including escaping as a prisoner-of-war in Europe in WWII. 

What was our motivation for seeking out Medway?  Thomas Smith was one of Researcher Sugar’s grandfathers.  Of course. 

What the sign doesn’t say about how Thomas Smith acquired the property is that he married the widow of Jan Van Arrsen.  Golddigger.  Tom is buried at Medway near the house. 

We were disappointed not to get onto the plantation, but Sugar has decided that he will write a letter to the trustees of the plantation and explain that he needs to visit his grandfather’s gravesite, for closure or something like that.  I think it’s worth a shot.  The worst is that they could say is no.  Or maybe “Hell no”. 

If anyone has an extra $25 million around, Medway is for sale.  I’ve got exactly $24 million, so perhaps someone can loan me $1 million.  One million doesn’t sound like much money when put in that context.  And don’t even think about sub-dividing the property.  It is protected land with two conservation easements.  When I buy it, I’ll invite everyone over.  But only if you request an invitation in my “comments” section. 

You know you want one.

You know you want one.

Or maybe I’ll just save my $24 million and buy this car.

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14 Responses to “Medway Plantation in Goose Creek, SC”

  1. kari Says:

    What a lovely day! I wish you could get in more. I am so curious to see what it looks like.

    Like

  2. Simba Says:

    I think you should be able to buy a Yellow Cab for a little less than that, but who knows with inflation being what it is.

    Like

  3. ruthrawls Says:

    That’s not a yellow cab, my man, that’s a GOLDEN RIDE.

    Like

  4. periodwardrobe Says:

    If you are interested, I have created a blog based on the over one hundred letters written by the Hyrne family whose daughter Mary (Molly) married Tomas (Langrave Smith): http://hyrneletters.wordpress.com/

    Like

  5. Another Country Heard From! « Ruthrawls's Blog Says:

    […] Yesterday I received an email from a woman in Lincolnshire, England. She read my post about Medway Plantation, and has provided us with a link to her blog, hyrne letters featuring transcriptions from letters […]

    Like

  6. Dawn Stanford Says:

    Love this! Thomas is my grandfather, too. I found a real estate brochure for Medway online, and the price has been knocked down to $19 million! The brochure had lots of pictures.

    Thanks for posting. I vicariously enjoyed your adventure.

    Dawn
    Savannah, GA

    Like

    • ruthrawls Says:

      Hi Dawn,
      How about we all go in together and buy Medway? $19 million?? That’s nuthin’. I’ll just write a check.
      Thank you for commenting!

      Like

  7. 2010 in review « Ruthrawls's Blog Says:

    […] Medway Plantation in Goose Creek, SC September 2009 8 comments 3 […]

    Like

  8. Longitude Lane « Ruthrawls's Blog Says:

    […] Thomas Smith of Medway Plantation fame.  If you click on his name here,  Thomas Smith, you will jump back in time to my post about searching out Medway.  But when Tom wasn’t on […]

    Like

  9. Maryan Holt Says:

    A number of years ago, my mother and I were able to visit Medway while it was still in possession of Mrs. L. We were allowed to visit my grandfather’s grave and to walk around the property. We visited again a few years later and had no problem in gaining admission. Then, one Christmas, I tried to take my children for a visit and encountered to same difficulty. However, we spoke with a man who is in charge of the gate and he informed us that there are certain times of the year when visitors are allowed, I believe arrangements have to be made through an organization in Columbia. It is such a lovely place.

    Like

  10. Jennifer W. Says:

    Hi. I know Medway is off of Hwy 52, but what roaddid you turn on to get to Medway Rd.? I live near there, but I’m not exactly sure where the plantation is located.

    Like

    • ruthrawls Says:

      Hi Jennifer W., and welcome to the blog! Do you know where the historical marker is? The actual turn off that highway is right before the historical marker. You take that road which winds between some warehouse-type buildings and over the railroad track, and it turns into Medway Road. At least that’s the way I remember it.

      Like

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