Posts Tagged ‘Huguenot’

Longitude Lane, Lunch, and the Huguenot Church

November 18, 2017

I use FaceBook as a way to stay in touch with people that have similar interests. I actually learn things along the way.

One such learned fact was the tours that were being conducted at the French Huguenot Church in Charleston, free of charge. This event happens in the spring and fall. Sugar challenged me that we could go except I had to work. I promptly answered his challenge by getting a day off work.

We had advice from one of the tour guides that we should park in the Cumberland Street parking garage, and then we could find the church on Church Street within a few blocks.

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Sugar had an excellent laminated map that I was unable to read in the car. The low, late autumn sun shining through the trees and around the buildings made a flashing light-and-shadow effect, like someone opening and closing the slats very quickly on a Venetian blind. I couldn’t focus, plus I got nauseous. I suggested that we pull over, but the traffic would make getting off the roadway and then back on very difficult. So we decided to wing it.

Sugar made a right instead of a left because he thought the church was south of the Broad. We wound around and found ourselves at Longitude Lane quite by accident. We had intended to make this the last stop of the day, so we’ll switch things up and make this the start of the day.

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Sugar has a smartphone now and is taking photos of everything. You probably know that Sugar and half the natural population of South Carolina is descended from Thomas Smith.

Thomas Smith,

Governor of South Carolina,

1693-1694,

Planter, merchant, surgeon, arrived in Charles Town in 1674 with his first wife, Barbara Atkins, and sons, Thomas and George. A cacique by 1690, he was created Landgrave by the Lords Proprietors on May 13, 1691. He died in his 46th year on November 16, 1694. His brick townhouse with a wharf on Cooper River was here on the corner of East Bay and Longitude Lane.

One of our landmarks to find was St. Philip’s steeple. The Huguenot Church is about a block away.

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We finally found a spot on the 4th level of the parking garage, and made our way to the Huguenot Church where we found the gate and front door were locked. We called the number on the sign, and the person answering sounded surprised that no one was there to give tours and offered to come right away. I suggested that we wait an hour for the tour so we could get food because we were both getting crankypants. And so it was agreed.

At the previous advice of a Charleston friend, we found Fast and French on Broad.

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The building is long and narrow with communal tables. No photos of the restaurant could be taken without getting lots of people in the shot, and I don’t like to put close-ups of people’s faces on the blog when they are simply out-and-about minding their own business.

Well, unless it’s a really once-in-a-lifetime shot. Or you wanted to pay me a million dollars.

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The food is fresh and interesting. You could go just to look at the murals.

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My plate used to hold a cucumber and yogurt soup, salmon on Canadian rye, and cream cheese on Canadian rye. Yes, that is a glass of white wine. Sugar ordered one of the many daily specials. He had a tomato bisque soup and fresh fruit and bread.

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This is a non-tipping establishment. Unattended money will be donated to Lutheran Services Carolinas, a refugee resettlement service.

Now to the church.

How do you pronounce Huguenot? Do an internet search. You might be surprised.

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You probably guessed that Sugar is descended from Pasteur Pierre Robert (Roh-BARE). Some of Robert’s descendants ended up in the present-day area of Robertville, SC, and if you have followed the blog before, you will know that we have taken Christmas poinsettias to the Robert Cemetery.

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I probably could have gotten the entire chandelier in the photograph if I had lain down on the floor. Somehow, that seemed disrespectful.

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The volunteer on duty said that the plaques around the perimeter were because of a fundraising effort of the church in 1899. You could have a plaque with your ancestor’s name if you donated money.

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There were other, more elaborate plaques adorning the walls.

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You probably know by now that you don’t pronounce the H in Horry. img_2887

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Be ye doers of the word not hearers only.

Nine simple words.

And that’s the French Protestant Church.