Posts Tagged ‘Garrard’

Gulielma Garrard, 1891-1906

April 11, 2016

Here’s another child of Mary Robert Lawton Garrard and Colonel William
Garrard that died too soon.

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Image accessed from ancestry.com on 4/10/16. I edited the image by outlining the specific record for Gulie Garrard.

She died in the Telfair Hospital on Apri 4, 1906, of tuberculosis after an illness of 6 weeks. She left behind her parents, her brother William, and her sisters Emily and Cecelia.

The Gold Mine in the Closet: Louis F. Garrard & the Georgia General Assembly’s Biographical Sketch

December 9, 2014

While in the gold mine in the closet, this page was also in the envelope that contained the crumbling pages from the State of Georgia’s General Assembly. You perhaps read the post from yesterday about William Starr Basinger.

Basinger had two daughters, Margaret and Mary “Leslie”.  Leslie married Edward Percival Lawton, who was a first cousin to Corinne Elliott Lawton, the daughter of Basinger’s law partner, Alexander Robert Lawton.  It was Corinne’s life and death that stirred so much ado on this blog, because her life and death has been misreported by “storyists” who give tours in Savannah, Georgia. The true story was found when I found her mother’s diary in the Georgia Historical Society’s collection, donated by Sarah Alexander Cunningham.

Hey, Corinne, I've got your back.

Hey, Corinne, I’ve got your back.

All these families are tied together through life, work, marriage, and community.

Leslie’s oldest daughter Margaret married William Garrard, a relation of Louis F. Garrard. I suppose that’s why this page was saved. Everyone knew everyone. If we digress even more, I believe that Basinger passed the Bateson Toy Shop on Drayton on his way to and from work.

Here’s the Honorable Louis F. Garrard…

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HON. LOUIS F. GARRARD.

(MUSCOGEE COUNTY)

Mr. GARRARD was born November 25, 1847, at Columbus.

His father, Mr. W. W. Garrard, was one of the leading citi-

zens of his city and State.  His mother’s maiden name was

Urquhart.  Louis F. Garrard was a member of the Alabama Corps of

Cadets at the outbreak of the war; at the age of sixteen was trans-

ferred to the Nelson Rangers, which acted as escort to General Ste-

phen D. Lee.  At the battle of Nashville, for gallantry on the battle-

field, he received a flattering recommendation from General Lee, secur-

ing for him a commission in the Regular Army of the Confederate

States, to take effect upon the close of hostilities.

Since the war he has been prominent as a citizen of Muscogee

county, serving as one of the Commissioners of the county, and, by

his marked financial ability, has the entire confidence of the whole

community.  After a service of four years in this capacity, he received

a unanimous re-election.  He was put forward by the people as a can-

didate for legislative honors, and, in the election, led the ticket.

In the house, Mr. Garrard is a member of the Committee on Fi-

nance.  He is the author of the celebrated Garrard bond bill, which

has elicited wide-spread discussion and most favorable comment from

men of distinguished financial ability throughout the State.  This bill

is an original idea with Mr. Garrard, and stamps him as a deep thinker

upon financial subjects.  He is looked upon as one of the rising finan-

ciers of the country.

Mr. Garrard is a member of the legal profession, and enjoys a lucra-

tive practice.  He was a member of the House in 1878, 1879 and was

again elected in 1880.

 

The Gold Mine in the Closet: The Garrard House in Gordonston

November 8, 2014

 

 

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How old do you think Sugar’s mother Genette looks?  She’s the one on the left.  The little girl on the right is actually her niece, Mary, the child of Genette’s sister Margaret, who was the oldest in the family and Genette was the youngest.

Mary was born about 1918, and her brother Billy in 1919.  So let’s imagine it’s about 1920, perhaps early in the year during cooler weather, given that the childen are wearing coats.  Perhaps the matriarch of this group, Mary “Leslie” Basinger Lawton, would walk with her little daughter Genette over to the Garrard house, and help take care of the children.  I’m completely making that up.  But they did live in the same neighborhood, so why wouldn’t they?

Here’s the Garrard house.  Let’s imagine again that the time frame is about 1920.  I don’t know yet when the house was built.

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Here’s the sales brochure again.  The Garrard house is on the bottom row on the left.

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I’ve cropped the photo out of the brochure.  Here it is.

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The tree on the left seems to be much bigger, and the side arbor seems vine-covered.

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The address is right, but the house has been changed a lot.  I see dormer windows on the 3rd floor now. And the foliage on the right property line is so dense from the street all the way back that we couldn’t get a proper shot from that angle.  At any rate, the arbor has been enclosed to make a room, and yet another room was added onto the end of that.  The enclosed arbor still has the columns which are visible above; at least, one column is visible.

In 1928 Margaret and her husband William Garrard were living at 7 Kinzie in Gordonston.

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In 1930, they are living at 600 Chatham Crescent, which is not in Gordonston at all.  Remember there’s not a 1929 City Directory for Savannah, unless Sugar has a copy in a closet.

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So we’re wondering why both the Lawtons and the Garrards left beautiful Gordonston around 1929, when suddenly we realize…

The Depression.

The Gold Mine in the Closet: Gordonston, Revisited at 11 Edgewood

November 6, 2014

According to the Savannah City Directory, the Edward Percival Lawton family was living at 11 Edgewood in Gordonston prior to 1930.

I took the Lawton house photo from the Gordonston sales brochure, which can be seen in the previous post, and rotated and cropped the photo.

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So we’re looking for a Dutch Colonial, if my design history serves me well.  Y’all feel free to call me out if I’m wrong.

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The house is on a corner, so we were able to make the turn and look into their backyard.  ‘Cause we have no shame.

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We turned around, which took some doing, because y’all know that I am from the South and it is bad manners to turn around in someone’s driveway, which meant an all-out three-point-turn in the middle of the street, and cruised back by.

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This door in the photo above is the front door.  It seems an odd arrangement, but perhaps it led to a foyer? mud room?  Air lock?

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Sugar’s mother Genette is on the bicycle on the left. I don’t know who is on the right. Perhaps Garnett Basinger, who would be Genette’s Uncle Walter’s daughter.

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Unknown woman, but clearly someone important in their lives, which is why people took photos in those days.

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Sugar’s grandmother is on the left. I can’t identify anyone else, so I’ll leave that up to you people out on the internet.

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Perhaps the child on the left is Matilda Basinger. And we don’t know who the baby is. Mary “Leslie” Basinger Lawton sits on the front steps of the house with her youngest daughter Genette to her left.

For some reason, in the box of photos are identical photos of Mary “Leslie” Basinger Lawton and one of her sons-in-law, Howard Read, who married her daughter Leslie.


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Here’s Leslie and Howard’s daughter, Margaret Louisa Read.

Don’t forget the interior shot again.  This room looks so pleasant and cool.  Of course, there was no television, and I’m wondering about a radio.  No air conditioning, no central heat, no storm windows.

Mary "Leslie" Basinger Lawton, her daughter Mary Genevieve "Genette" Lawton, her grandson Billy Garrard, her daughter Margaret Lawton Garrard, and her granddaughter Mary Garrard.

Mary “Leslie” Basinger Lawton, her daughter Mary Genevieve “Genette” Lawton, her grandson Billy Garrard, her daughter Margaret Lawton Garrard, and on the floor, her granddaughter Mary Garrard.

And that’s 11 Edgewood.  The numbers have changed, but the basic facade remains the same.  It looks like an addition was added to the rear, from the photos we took a few days ago.

 

From the 1928 Savannah City Directory, we find that Edward and Leslie Lawton were living at 11 Edgewood in Gordonston.  Their daughter Genette is listed as Jeanetta.  Yet the following year, when Edward dies in Paris, their address is listed at 219 East Gaston Street.  There is no 1929 City Directory in existence, unless Sugar has one in his closet.

From the 1928 Savannah City Directory, we find that Edward and Leslie Lawton were living at 11 Edgewood in Gordonston. Their daughter Genette is listed as Jeanetta. Yet the following year, when Edward dies in Paris, their address is listed at 219 East Gaston Street on the death certificate. There is no 1929 City Directory in existence, unless Sugar has one in his closet.

Oh, to step back in time.  This is a close second.