Posts Tagged ‘Densler’

Finally at Colonial Cemetery…

February 3, 2020

And here our story draws to a close.

After leaving Laurel Grove, we were able to head downtown and easily find a parking spot. We were here in Savannah a few weeks prior, and the city was packed with tourists and no parking was to be had.

Savannah has a system where you park, purchase a ticket from a kiosk, and put the ticket in your dashboard in plain sight. Ah, but it is Sunday, and parking is free.

We’re near the northeast entrance. I’m interested in finding Barbara Densler, but I can’t figure out the map.

It looks like we’ll just wander around.

In this cemetery many victims of the

Great Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1820

were buried.

Nearly 700 Savannahians died that year, including two local physicians who lost their lives caring for the stricken.

Several epidemics followed. In 1854 The Savannah Benevolent Association was organized to aid the families of the fever victims.

IN

memory of

HANNAH G. SHEFTALL

consort of

Mordecai Sheftall Jr.

who was born

on the 15th February

1803,

and departed this life

on the 10th November

1834.

In thee we lose a friend sincere,

A loving wife, and mother dear,

Securely rest, thy sleeping dust,

Till the last trump awakes the just.

I recognize the name Sheftall from the records I’ve been using to research the Denslers.

Leslie noticed the Odingsell marker so he is encouraging me to research that name. Personally I’m not interested in researching famous people. Perhaps you have noticed.

img_0684

Here endured the fate of the ***

the earthly part of

MAJOR CHARLES ODINGSELLS

during the Revolutionary war,

a Patriot Soldier

*****(illegible)*****

In each capacity

his conduct was such as justly acquired

him as much confidence and popularity

in this County, as any man in it

He died, on Skidaway Island

on the

2nd day of December 1816

Aged 56 Years.

*****

SACRED to the last Remains of the

Children of Charles Odingsells, Edqr.

lie buried in this Tomb,

with the ashes of their Father.

Charles Spencer Odingsells,

departed this life October 17, 1817,

Aged 6 Years 7 Months & 6 days,

Mary Susannah Odingsells,

departed this life November 6, 1817.

Aged 9 Years & 7 days.

This is another large slab that is too big to photograph easily for transcription purposes, so I usually take a series of shots so that I can transcribe later.

This probably means we need to go to Skidaway Island.

Except there’s this guy Malbone, who is/was famous. I learned of him because of his cousin Robert Mackay.

EDWARD GREENE MALBONE

(1777-1807)

Beneath this modest slab rest the remains of America’s foremost painter of miniatures.

Malbone, a native of Rhode Island, began his career in Providence at the age of seventeen. He pursued his calling in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Charleston and in London, England.

Exacting and unceasing work undermined his constitution. Having sought in vain to recover his health in the island of Jamaica, he came to Savannah in fore-knowledge of death and died here in the home of his cousin, Robert Mackay, on May 7, 1807.

Though not yet thirty years of age when he died, he left no peer in his art. Time has justified the statements you may read here in his epitaph. Today Malbone is acknowledged to be the finest miniaturist his country has yet produced, and among the greatest of all time anywhere.

025-21 GEORGIA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 1954

Sacred in the Memory of

Mr. EDWARD G. MALBONE

the celebrated Painter

Son of the late Gen. John Malbone of Newport, R.I.

(the remainder is largely illegible)

We’re near the northwest entrance and are ready to call it a day. I skitter around the last few markers that are legible. No Barbara.

I snapped one of a Moravian marker. The stone was so dark that I had to edit the image in order to read it. The grass and foliage are not this ishy shade of greeny yellow.

IN MEMORY OF

MORAVIAN COLONISTS

WHO DIED IN SAVANNAH

FRIEDRICH RIEDEL     1795

JACOB FRANK     1736

HENRY ROSCHER     1736

ROSINA HABERECHT     1736

MATTHIAS BOHNISCH     1736

GEORGE HABERLAND     1737

ANNA CATHERINA ROSE     1737

JOHN MICHAEL SCHOBER     1739

Erected by

MORAVIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

OF PENNSYLVANIA

WACHOVIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

OF NORTH CAROLINA

COLONIAL PARK

This cemetery, the second in Colonial Savannah, was the burying ground for the city from about 1750 until it was closed against burials in 1853.

Among the distinguished dead who rest here are Archibald Bullock, first President of Georgia; James Habersham, acting royal Governor of the Province, 1771-’73; Joseph Habersham, Postmaster General under three Presidents; Lachalan McIntosh, Major General, Continental Army; Samuel Elbert, Revolutionary soldier and Governor of Georgia; Capt. Denis L. Cottineau de Kerloguen who aided John Paul Jones in the engagement between the “Bon Homme Richard” and the “Serapis”; Hugh McCall, early historian of Georgia; Edward Greene Malbone, the noted miniaturist, and Colonel John S. McIntosh, a hero of the War with Mexico.

The remains of Major General Nathanael Greene who died in 1786 reposed in the Graham vault until they were reinterred in 1901 in Johnson Square.

The cemetery became a city park in 1896.

025-20 GEORGIA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 1954

As usual, we have arrived at the front of the situation after going in and around through other avenues. This sign is at the main entrance, although you can enter and leave from any gateway. Isn’t that like life? There are many ways to approach a situation and perhaps none of them are wrong.

I think this ends the Densler saga. Who’s to say? Does research and poking about ever really end? Because who is William Densler, chairmaker? These images are from ancestry.com from a collection of the names of early artisans.

DenslerWilliam chairmaker 1806 note 2DenslerWilliam chairmaker 1806 note 1

Do you have a Densler chair? Was this a thing? And why don’t I find a newspaper ad for William Densler, like I do for Henry and Frederick Densler, and vice-versa.

Was a chairmaker an actual chair maker or were there specialists in the field? It appears that the Denslers were makers of riding chairs for horses and wagons, carriages, buggies, etc.

 

From the Columbia, 1797:

Columbian_Museum_&_Savannah_Advertiser_1797-04-07 DenslerHenry Chairmaker

The Subscriber,

Returns his most respectful thanks to his Friends and the Public in general, for the encouragement he has received, and is sorry he could not serve his customers since the fire of the 26th November last; but now offers his service with pleasure, at his shop in Bull Street, on Doctor Brickell’s Lot, where he formerly lived — where all kinds of Riding Chairs are made and repaired on the shortest notice, and in the neatest manner Orders from the country, will be strictly attended to and thankfully received, by their obedient humble servant.

HENRY DENSLER.

April 7. 11-8T

 

Georgia_Gazette_1798-12-13 DenslerHenry chairmaker

HENRY DENSLER, Chair Maker,

BEGS leave to inform his friends, and the public in general, that he has removed his shop nearly opposite the Courthouse, where he still carries on the said business in the neatest manner.

N. B. Orders from the country will be strictly attended to, and executed on the shortest notice.

Work done cheap for cath.

Savannah, 3d Dec. 1798.

Savannah Republican, 1808:

Savannah_Republican_1808-03-10_[1]

Insley and Densler dissolved their partnership. Savannah Republican, 1810:

Savannah_Republican_1810-04-03 Densler partnership dissolved

9/24/1829, Georgian

Georgian_1829-09-24 Densler Ad

Frederick seems to be a salesperson in addition to a chairmaker. I suppose he was like a car salesman of that time, new and used.

So, the Denslers kept America rolling. Good-night, Densler people. It’s been an interesting ride.

The Catalogue of Chatham Academy, 1832-1833

January 12, 2020

While looking for more Densler information on ancestry.com, I found this little jewel in its entirety.

The 3 Densler children of Frederick and Mary are mentioned and BONUS! William Starr Basinger, written as “Bassinger” which it often is, and gives us a clue as to the correction pronunciation.

CATALOGUE

OF THE

TRUSTEES, INSTRUCTERS AND STUDENTS

OF

CHATHAM ACADEMY,

SAVANNAH, GEO.

FROM NOVEMBER 5TH, 1832, TO MAY 5TH, 1833.

**SAVANNAH:

W. T. WILLIAMS,

1833

BOARD OF TRUSTEES.

REV. EDWARD NEUFVILLE, PRESIDENT.

GEORGE GLEN, ESQ. SECRETARY.

WM. THORNE WILLIAMS, ESQ. TREASURER.

RICHARD W. HABERSHAM, ESQ.

DR. wILLIAM C. DANIELL.

BENJAMIN E. STILES, ESQ.

ANTHONY BARCLAY, ESQ.

RICHARD R. CUYLER, ESQ.

HON. WILLIAM LAW.

 

Louisa F. Alexander and Sarah R. Alexander, from Wilkes Co., Washington, Georgia. Louisa married Jeremy Gilmer and Sarah married Alexander Robert Lawton.

William S. Bas(s)inger from Savannah. He would have been about 5 years old.

Sisters Mary W. Densler and Rebecca A. Densler from Savannah, both of whom are mentioned in their mother’s will of 1852. Their brother Edwin W. Densler is noted here, but isn’t mentioned in the will because he died in 1843. There was another young son named William S. Densler who was born and died in 1815. I found him by chance while looking for another William Densler.

RECAPITULATION.

Whole number of Females, 153

Whole number of Males, 84

Total, 237

REMARKS.

It is the intention of the Principals of this Institution, to afford every facility to young ladies and gentlemen for acquiring a thorough and practical education.

The Principals will devote their whole time to the benefit of their pupils, assisted, in the departments of instruction, by competent helps. It is the object of the Trustees to afford every facility, for the successful prosecution of study, and the attainment, in the Female Department, of a good female education; in the Male Department, to prepare young gentlemen for college, or give them as good an education as can be furnished by the best high schools.

The location of the Academy is airy, commanding a delightful prospect. Its apartments are spacious and pleasant, fitted up with convenience and elegance. Maps, Globes, and Chemical and Philosophical Apparatus, will soon be provided.

The pupils are so classes, as to provide for their receiving instruction from several teachers, by way of explanations and illustrations. No pains will be spared to make them understand the studies to which they attend, and to induce in them the habit of thinking for themselves. A course of Chemical lectures will be delivered during the next fall and winter terms, by one of the teachers. It is very desirable that those, who enter the school, be present at the commencement of the term.

This city, in the healthfulness of its situation, in the moral and religious character of its citizens, and its easy communication with almost every part of the State, particularly of the low country, holds out many inducements to parents, who wish to send their sons and daughters abroad for instruction.

Tuition in the Primary Department, per term of 12 weeks — $6 00

Do. in the Junior do. — 8 00

Do. in the Senior do. — 10 00

Do. for the Classics, — 12 50

Do. in addition to any of the above English Studies, for the Classics, Mathematics, &c. — 2 50

Do. in the French Department, — 8 00

I haven’t found much information online as to when the Chatham Academy began. I’ll poke around some more and if/when I find out more, I’ll add that here.

FlowerFest 2015: Stops One and Two

December 8, 2015

We’re off on our annual poinsettia-placing to Savannah. 

 

Ten!

  

From SC into GA


Sugar and I head into Laurel Grove first. It’s on the west side of town, so we approach it first once we cross over the bridge. 

Our goal is to start with the Densler and Bateson plots, then finish up at the Lawton-Jones mausoleum. As we drove along the lane, we got visually side-tracked by a limping dog, who limped along across the lane in front of us and joined another dog. Then a little shepherd mix PUPPY popped out of the underbrush, right by a black dog that might have been his mother. We had no food in the car to give them. It was all disconcerting. 

The dogs melted into the underbrush, but the puppy came out to bark at us. 

  
There was really nothing we could do about the dogs, except leave them. 

We parked back of the Densler mausoleum and walk around to the front. Mrs. Mary Densler is buried here, and she is William Starr Basinger’s Aunt Polly. More correctly, I believe she is the sister of his mother’s mother Ann Pearson Starr. 

   
   
Some of the bricks look clean and repointed. 

We walk over a few lanes to the Bateson plot. This lot is special to us. We discovered in 2014 that there were Batesons right here in Savannah in an unmarked plot, and Sugar ordered a stone for them. There are 10 people buried here in a lot that can hold 12. The last burial was in 1879, that of the child, Thomas Remington Bateson. No one was left to mark the burial place until 135 years later when a Sugar came along. 

   
    
    
  
I always want to just sit with these people. I wonder what they would think of this: the picture-taking, the blogging, the marking of the plot. And the automobiles, the traffic, the sounds of the interstate nearby, the planes overhead. Every vehicle was pulled by animal power when these folks were alive. I want to talk to them, or actually, simply to listen to what they have to say. This family breaks my heart. 

It’s time to go to Jones-Lawton. 

  
This crypt is on 4 plots, if I understand it correctly. There are 4 graves buried outside the crypt, Sugar’s aunt Emily Augusta Lawton, and his first cousins Mary Garrard Mackin and her brother William, and William’s wife Alice Knott Garrard. 

Inside are at least 18 people. The story goes that it was built by Augustus Seaborn Jones for himself and his wife Emily Robert Jones. Here’s where things get convoluted. Their daughter Elizabeth “Bessie” Jones married Dr. William Seabrook Lawton (they are Sugar’s great-grandparents).  Their son Edward Percival Lawton (he is Sugar’s grandfather) and daughter Gulielma Lawton Read (she married Abram Carrington Read) are buried there, but not their spouses. Another daughter of Edward Percival is there: Leslie Lawton Read, who married a different branch of the Reads. Leslie’s daughter Margaret Louisa Read is there, and she took the last spot. (Another daughter of Edward Percival’s is Emily Augusta Lawton, already mentioned.)

So many Lawtons, so little time. 

   
  

Sugar spots a rainbow effect over Jones-Lawton.

  

We walk around the grounds, noting that the crepe myrtles could be cut back yet again. 

 

From the rear


It’s time now to go somewhere we’ve never gone, literally and figuratively. 

The day before, I had an online conversation with another of Sugar’s Lawton cousins who mentioned that his grandfather Jefferson Brown, a Lawton descendant, lived at 1024 36th Street. I offered to go by to see if the house still stood. 
His name is Jordan, and he tested with 23&me. He’s definitely a Lawton. 

  
You can read his story at the 23&me website.