Posts Tagged ‘Beaufort District’

The 1839 Will of Sarah Lawton

April 19, 2017

Sarah Lawton died on October 6, 1839, according to a remembrance written by her grandson that I posted here on the blog about “Our Grandmother”.

I started to title this post: “The Will of Sarah Lawton”, and then realized that the title might make her sound “willful”. She might have been just that, because she was a strong influence on her children and grandchildren, according to the writer of the remembrance, Joseph Thomas Robert, in 1878. 

There are new online references being added what seems like every day. But the closer I get to the end of my life, the faster time seems to fly. I’m afraid that I will run out of time before I’m satisfied. 

Recently I discovered Sarah Lawton’s will on ancestry.com. It is a typewritten copy of the original which is at the Caroliniana Library in Columbia, SC. I can see, in my mind’s eye, someone hunched over a manual Royal typewriter, making the original document legible and available to us. 

I also discovered that page 4 is missing from the ancestry collection. This might mean that a trip to the library is in order. 


Ah, whoever did the transcription also included a breakdown of the descendants. 


Identification of the legatees follows. 

The 22nd is Martha Amanda Lawton, and I wrote about her in a separate post as Amanda M. Miller.


The body of the will is so different from that of a man’s perspective. She leaves personal items, clothing, textiles, and household goods to her granddaughters. She rarely mentions a male unless it is in reference to a female, except for Alexander James Lawton. She also mentions by name the three Mosse sisters that married the three Lawton brothers.  

She also leaves some of her slaves to her descendants, and this makes me wonder if I can match these people to the list of slaves enumerated by Alexander James Lawton in his plantation journal. 

Sarah lived another 24 years after the death of her husband Joseph Lawton. She did not wither nor die without leaving her legacy on the family. 

And that is the will of Sarah Lawton. 

The Revolutionary War Pension File of William Rawls

September 24, 2016

Annnddd the last pension file to produce belongs to William Rawls. No kin. Once again.

rawlswilliam-pension-file-001rawlswilliam-pension-file-002rawlswilliam-pension-file-003

REVOLUTIONARY WAR RECORDS SECTION.

3-525

_____

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

BUREAU OF PENSIONS

Washington, D. C.S. F. 47.905

In reply to your request of _____, received _____ for a statement of the military history of William Rawls a soldier of the REVOLUTIONARY WAR, you will find below the desired information as contained in his (or his widow’s) application for pension on file in this Bureau.

DATES OF ENLISTMENT OR APPOINTMENT.

1776 OR 1777

LENGTH OF SERVICE.

Served at various times about 2 years.

RANK.

Pvt.

OFFICERS UNDER WHOM SERVICE WAS RENDERED.

CAPTAIN.

John Garvin

Tinnel

McCay

COLONEL.

Gadsden

Hammond

STATE.

S. C.

Battles engaged in, Sumters Defeat and Kings Mountain.

Residence of soldier at enlistment, Buford District S. C.

Date of application for pension, Nov. 9, 1832. His ?? was ??.

Residence at date of application, Gadsden Co., Fla.

Age at date of application, 73 years, born in North Carolina

Remarks: He was the son of John Rawls. It is not stated whether he was married. Brothers John & Cotten.

Respectfully,

Commissioner

rawlswilliam-pension-file-005

Territory of Florida

County of Gadsden

On this 9th day of November 1812 personally appeared in open court before Thomas Randol, Judg of the Superior court of the Middle District of Florida now sitting, William Rawls, a resident of the County and Territory aforesaid aged about 73 years who being duly sworn according to law doth by his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress dated June the 7th 1812.

That he entered the service of the United States in the year 1776 or 1777 in the summer of one of those years but which year he does not distinctly recollect. He entered the service under the command of Captain John Garvin and was detached to the regiment of Colo. Gasden and served under them three months. Genl. Bull was the Genl in command during those three months. He was stationed on Beaufort Island, South Carolina. He was then relieved of service for a short time but was called out again in the same year and under the same officers and performed another tour of duty of three months when he was stationed at the seaboard near Beaufort Island at a place called Scotch Neck. Then after the expiration of said last mentioned three months he was not called again into service until the latter part of the year 1778 or the first of the year 1779 shortly before the British forces took possession of Savannah. He remained in service during that tour only one month and was under the command of the same

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before specified time. He was not called into service again until the latter part of 1779 and was stationed at Perrysberg in South Carolina under the command of the same captain and Colo as aforesaid and under the command of Genl Linkhorn (Lincoln). The length of time he served during that tour he does not distinctly recollect but it was until the arrival of the First Fleet at Savannah. Then he was there relieved from service for a short time but was again called into service about four months afterwards and was marched down to Savannah and arrived there two days after the attack was made on Savanah by the French and Americans (?). He was march from Savanah to Perrysburg under the command of Colo Gasden and Captain Garvin and remained at Perryburg about one month when he was relieved from further duty at that time. He was called into service again in about two months under the same officers and acting on the Savanah River and continued to perform duty (?) said service until Charlestown fell into the possession of the British. He then moved into North Carolina and joined Genl Sumpters Army in the year 1780. He joined Captain Tinnels company at the battle of King’s

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Mountain and at which battle Colo Williams and Colo Shelby and Colo Campbell were the principal officers. Then he was not again in service until the siege of Augusta when he was under the command of Captain Mery and Colo Hammond and then after the Americans took possession of Augusta he was not again in service. That when he first entered the service he resided in Beaufort District South Carolina, that he first entered the service of the United States as a private and substitute for his father John Rawls, that he performed the first tour of duty as a substitute and all the other tours as a drafted ;militia up to the fall of Charlestown and from that time as a volunteer that he was at the battle on the Cataubaw in which Genl Sumpter was defeated and was in the battle of Kings Mountain that he marched through the country from Beaufort District South Carolina to Savanah in Georgia and from Savannah to Perrysburg in said state and from that place to Kings Mountain there performed service with the (?) officers before moved but does not recollect the names of the regiments that he knew Major Harry and Genl Linkhorn and Genl Sumpter and that he has no (?) evidence by which he can substantiate his claims and that he knows of no person whose testimony

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he can at this time procure to substantiate his claim that their are some persons who are acquainted with his services and who were living at the last accounts but they reside in distant parts of the United States and he does not know that they know to make the necessary prooff.

W. M. Rawls

Sworn and subscribed in open court

R. C. Lester Clk. GSC

By J R Adams DC

And the said William Rawls being first interrogated on the interrogation presented by the War Dept. and (?) was being first duly sworn.

That he was born in North Carolina near the Virginia Line, that he does not recollect the year in which he was born. That he once had a record of his age, but it was burnt or lost during the Revolutionary War. That he was living in Beaufort District of South Carolina when called into service, that shortly after the Revolutionary War, he removed into Georgia into what was then Effingham and is now Screven County, where he lived until his removal into this county of Gadsden, Territory of Florida in the year 18?? where he now lives. That in his first military service he was a substitute for his father John Rawls a soldier in the militia. That of the (?) officers with whom he served he recollects at the (?) of his (?)

rawlswilliam-pension-file-009

 

S.C.

William Rawls S47905

Middle Florida

Gadson County

Personally came before me McKeen Greene who being duly sworn saith he has been intimately acquainted with William Rawls of the County aforesaid and Conection, ever since 1778. I do know that the whole of that family were warm friends of their Country through the American Revolutionary War and said Rawls & his two eldest brothers John & Cotten were generally esteemed (??) and brave soldiers through all the Southern struggles. (??) from the fall of Savannah of Georgia till this evacuation of Savannah aforesaid & Charleston of South Carolina. Soon after said William moved into the state of Georgia and after many years moved to Middle Florida where he now resides.

McKeen Greene

Sworn to before me this 24th of Oct 1832

John Littleton Jr.

*****

Here’s what I’ve got to say about this file: my father’s Rawls ancestors have been identified in a DNA group as a group originating in Nansemond County, Virginia. Nansemond is a defunct county now, but it was on the NC line. It appears that William Rawls was not married or had descendants.

I haven’t looked at this file in almost twenty years. With it, I found my handwritten transcription notes. I had transcribed all except a bit of the last page of testimony. Almost twenty years ago, I didn’t know that someday I would be living in the former Beaufort District of South Carolina, near Effingham and Screven Counties of Georgia.

Seriously? I have ENOUGH projects, but I think this file has just moved near to the top.

 

Back to Bostick Cemetery

October 2, 2015

Why?

   
   
Because Lawtons. 

  
William Henry Lawton married Catherine Maner. And they are buried in Bostick. 

  
Sugar and I have met so many folks who are descended from William Henry and Catherine. He was itching to get back to Bostick, a sort of pilgrimage for those who can’t go. 

  
Of course, when we get there, a clash of wills begins. He wants me to take a photo of William Henry and Catherine’s markers so we can leave. Not me. I am enamored of the day, and I poke about, trying to get the best angle of things, and actually taking the long way ’round. Because dead people. Don’t act like you don’t know what I’m talking about. 

Finally we arrive at the source of our destination. 

   
 To further unintentionally aggravate him, I’m taking photos with the iPhone and uploading them to FaceBook immediately. Poor Sugar. 

His…   
   
 
  Hers…
   
   
  
A few more… 
   
   
   
   
   
   
That’s part of Bostick. 

Inside the fence. 

Robertville, My Rohbuhtvull, Part 5: The Sale of a Negro Man Named April

September 14, 2014

(This is the 5th part of a series from a booklet compiled by Ora C. Paul, which is in the archives of the Beaufort County Public Library, Beaufort District Collection.)

008

State of South Carolina

Beaufort District

St. Peter’s Parish

Received this 25th day of November in the year

of our Lord 1830 of J. H. Robert, Five Hundred

Dollars, being in full for a negro man named April –

which negro man was deeded to me by my grandfather

Samuel Maner, in a deed commonly called a deed of

gift – dated 28th April 1815.

Samuel M. Robert

Witness:

Wm. H. F. Robert

Thos. H. Dixon

Beaufort District

St. Peter’s Parish

Personally appeared before me, William H. E.

Robert who being duly sworn sayeth that he was present

and saw Wm. Robert sign with instruments and that he

with Thos. H. Dixon were the subscribing witness thereto.

Wm. H. F. Ravenel

Sworn before me

10th Jan. 1831

John Riley