Posts Tagged ‘Alexander Robert Lawton’

A Letter from Mulberry Grove, January 23, 1863

June 18, 2016

If you read a bit of the last post, you will know that Colonel Alexander James Lawton is the common thread that runs throughout the paper presented by E. L. Inabinett to the Lawton Family reunion in 1963. 

One hundred years earlier, on January 23, 1863, Alexander James Lawton wrote to his son Alexander Robert Lawton about the death of another son, Edward Payson Lawton, who died at Fredericksburg. Edward’s wife Evalina “Loyer” Davant Lawton had learned that he was wounded and had traveled from lower South Carolina to tend to him. Upon arrival she learned that he was deceased. 

The letter written by the Colonel describes in great detail the events before and after Edward’s death. He says that Edward’s body had been embalmed, which was a relief for me to know how people traveled with a deceased person. I’ve read of other accounts of widows reeclaiming their husbands who were killed, and now this makes me think that the bodies must have always been embalmed. I suppose now that I was expected to know that, because there was never a mention of embalming, but really, how would I know that? I suppose that I was to assume that. What a relief.

He also mentions another son, George Mosse Lawton, and George’s wife, the former Mary Lewis. We don’t know much about George. Strangely, he’s not recorded except in small bits here and there, like in George’s sister-in-law’s journal, that of Sarah Alexander Lawton, when she records his sudden death. 
These images come to me from a descendant, Elisabeth, of Edward Payson Lawton and Evalina “Loyer” Davant Lawton. It’s fun for me to note that Loyer is pronounced LOW-yuh. Reminds me that a Sugar’s mother said STEAM-uh and RIV-uh. 

   
   

The Gold Mine in the Closet: William Starr Basinger & the Georgia General Assembly’s Biographical Sketch

December 8, 2014

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GEORGIA’S

GENERAL ASSEMBLY

OF 1880-1.

*****

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

OF

SENATORS, REPRESENTATIVES, THE GOVERNOR, AND HEADS

OF DEPARTMENTS.

ILLUSTRATED WITH PORTRAITS.

*****

COPYRIGHTED BY JAS. P. HARRISON & CO.

*****

ATLANTA, GEORGIA

JAS. P. HARRISON & CO., PRINTERS, ELECTROTYPERS, & BINDERS

1882

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1882, by

JAMES P. HARRISON & CO.,

In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

 

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HON. W. S. BASINGER.

(CHATHAM COUNTY.)

We have been unable to secure the necessary data for a bio-

graphical sketch of this distinguished gentleman, and conse-

quently can give only a brief glance at some of the more

recent events in his public life.

For several years previous to his election to the present General

Assembly, he was a member of the eminent law firm of Jackson, Law-

ton & Basinger, his partners being General Henry R. Jackson and

General Alexander R. Lawton, gentlemen who have won the highest

honors as military commanders and legal advisers.  No law fim in

the State had a more substantial reputation.

Colonel Basinger therefore came to the Legislature with a standing

in legal circles that placed him at once in the front rank of the ablest

members of the House, and secured to him positions on the most

important committees.

Speaker Bacon knowing well his capacity and fitness for the several

duties assigned him, placed Colonel Basinger at the head of the Com-

mittee on Banks, an right well has he discharged the delicate trusts

connected with this chairmanship.

As Vice-Chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs, and as a

member of the General Judiciary Committee, and the Committee on

Corporations, he has likewise displayed his thorough knowledge of all

legal questions, of military organization and discipline, and of the laws

governing corporations.  No committeeman has done better or more

conscientious work than he.

Colonel Basinger is a quiet, unostentatious member, and seldom speaks

on any question; if he does address the House, it is where he has

something to say that is worth listening to, and which is always pre-

sented in a dignified, pointed and practical manner.  He wastes no

words, resorts to no tricks of oratory, yet never fails to hold the close

attention of the House to the close of his brief but comprehensive

speeches.

In January, 1861, by order of Colonel A. R. Lawton, of the First

Georgia Regiment, under instructions from Governor Joseph E. Brown,

the Oglethorpe Barracks, in Savannah, were taken possession of by

Colonel Basinger then a company officer for the State of Georgia,

thus making him one of the earliest actors in the opening scenes of

the “War between the States.”

 


 

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And Colonel A. R. Lawton?  That’s Corinne Elliott Lawton’s father.