Posts Tagged ‘Albert C. Lengnick’

Linked By Lengnicks: Charles A. Lengnick, the Patriarch

March 15, 2015

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Lengnick, Charles A.        (card 1/2)

PP           June 4, 1903       p. 2

CHARLES A. LENGNICK.

Death of a Good Man and Citizen.

The death of this estimable gentleman

occurred in Greenville during the night of

the 27. He had been in feeble health for

some time, had spent a while in Camden,

and had lately gone to Greenville in the

hope of renewing his better physical con-

dition, and was the guest of his sister-

in-law, Mrs. John H. Houston. Mr.

Lengnick was born in Dresden, Saxony,

in 1834, and came to this country in

young manhood, and married Miss Mary

Burdell, of Charleston. Besides his

widow, he left three sons, Messrs. J. M.

Lengnick, E. E. Lengnick and Albert

Lengnick. The two former resides in

Beaufort, and the latter in St. Louis.

His two daughters are Mrs. John Wilson,

of Waynesville, N. C., and Mrs. J. S. Bur-

dell, of Camden, S. C. He also left several

grandchildren.

Mr. Lengnick came to Charleston when

quite a young man, and engaged in busi-

ness. When the Civil War began, he was

among those other brave spirits who volun-

teered to defend their adopted home from

the invader. He volunteered with the

German Artillery, and is reported to have

been a good soldier. At the close of the

war, with his brother, he engaged in the

wholesale notion business on Hayne street,

Charleston, but the financial crash that

visited the country a few years latter

crushed him along with many other busi-

ness houses all over the land.

In all the walks of life Mr. Lengnick

was a man most gentle in manner and con-

duct, and was esteemed by all who had the

pleasure of his acquaintance. He was a

devoted husband, a fond father, and a

good, true friend, and the news of his

death, while not entirely unexpected,

brought sadness and sorrow to many

friends, who feel the deepest and warmest

sympathy for the afflicted wife and be-

reaved children, who mourn the loss here

of a husband and father whose memory is

of a husband and father whose memory is

worthy of all honor. As for ourselves, we

shall sorely miss our good old friend, who

we have known for many years.

The remains, accompanied by Mrs. Leng-

nick and Mr. J. M. Lengnick, who were

with him at his demise, and Mrs. Wilson

and Mrs. Burdell, reached Beaufort Fri-

day evening at twilight and were taken to

St. Helena Church, the church deceased

attended in life when, in the presence of a

large gathering of friends, the solemn and

impressive services of the Episcopal

Church were read by the rector, Rev W. L.

Githens. The pallbearers were Messrs. C. E.

Danner, R. R. Legare, B. S. Sams, W. H.

McFeeley, D. W. Crocker, W. R. Bris-

tol and C. C. Townsend. The mortal re-

mains were laid to rest in the cemetery at-

tached to the church; the grave being

buried beneath beautiful floral tributes

contributed by sorrowing friends.

Georgia On My Mind

January 11, 2015

And by that I mean Georgia Agnes Bateson.

All because a gentleman commented on the blog.

The Rev. Christopher Bateson is my great, great, great, Grandfather. I have be working on the family history for a number of years. have a letter from Thomas Bateson, of Savannah,Ga. written to his uncle Henry in England on April 23, 1873, on the business stationary.
In this letter he says he has taken over the business from his father, and that he has three children, Alice, Georgina Agnes, and Thomas Remington.
I am trying to find out more about this branch of the family. I am visiting in Florida this winter and am planning a trip to Savannah.
Any help you can give me would be appreciated.

Once I found out that Georgia’s middle names was Agnes and that she married a Lengnick, her married name sounded familiar. I racked my little brain until I realized that I had copied parts of a paper “Beaufort Memoirs” written by a woman named Lena Wood Lengnick, and published them here on the blog. Plus, it helps to have a search bar on the blog, since I use the blog for my scrapbook and external brain.

Then I found Georgia on another person’s ancestry.com tree. She’s mjlintexas, and she had the photo of Georgia.

She also had other photos of people in Georgia’s family, like Georgia’s husband Albert, and photos of houses, like Georgia’s husband’s brother Emil’s house. And Emil? Just happened to marry Lena Wood Lengnick, so Lena and Georgia were sisters-in-law.

Sugar found Emil and Lena’s house in one of his books, so that means…

Off to Beaufort!

Soon we’re at the St. Helena Episcopal Church where Georgia’s grandparents Daniel and Agnes Mann and some of her aunts and uncles are buried. We’ve visited them before.

Our interest today is the Lengnick family.

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While we are leaving the churchyard, the clock starts to chime the hour.

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I stand on tippy toes and photograph the Mann family plot right at the corner. Daniel has the flag and the headstone. We don’t know on which side of him is buried his wife Agnes.

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Further along North Street is the Emil Edward Lengnick house. It’s BIG. He must have done well.

It’s an inn now.

We park across the street in a parking area that probably belongs to the house that fronts on Bay, which is one block over. So basically the Lengnick house faced the back of another house.

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The story is that the house was situated with the entrance at an angle to gather the bay breezes.

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Sugar is feeling bold and walks all around the house. I follow him, of course. I’m bold in numbers like that.

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We’re only one block off the bay. I took this shot from the back corner of the house to see if I could see the water.

 

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As we get back to the van, I realize that the house is front of us is the Scheper house. Georgia’s mother Martha Mann Bateson had a sister Louisa, who married a Scheper. So Georgia had a sister-in-law and an aunt who were neighbors, and surely she visited with both.

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Good-bye, Lengnick house. We’ve got to go to Georgia. Savannah, that is…

Two days later, we’re at Georgia Historical, and we find in the newspaper extracts this item:

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SAVANNAH NEWSPAPER DIGEST

MARRIAGE AND MARRIAGES

SMN August 12, 1891: 8/4 – A. C. Lengnick, with S. Guckenheimer &

Sons, left yesterday for Beaufort, where he will marry to-day,

at the St. Helena Episcopal Church, Miss Georgia Bateson. They 

will pass through Savannah to-night enroute to Asheville, where

they will spend two weeks at the Battery Park.

SMN August 13, 1891: 8/3 – Albert C. Lengnick of this city and

Miss Georgia A. Bateson, daughter of the late Thomas Bateson of

Savannah, were married at the St. Helena Episcopal Church in 

Beaufort, S.C., yesterday. Mr. Lengnick is with S. Guckenheimer

& Sons.

So here’s my best guess. Since Georgia is getting married in Beaufort at the St. Helena Episcopal Church, I’m guessing that she and her sister Alice have been living in Beaufort instead of Savannah after their parents died, most probably with their grandmother Agnes Mann.

I really thought there would be no more mention of the Bateson family in the Savannah records after Thomas Remington Bateson died in 1879 and the girls were living at the Episcopal Orphan Home in 1880.

I might just have to go back to see.

 

Another Clue in the Bateson Tree

January 7, 2015

A gentleman commented on the blog.

The Rev. Christopher Bateson is my great, great, great, Grandfather. I have be working on the family history for a number of years. have a letter from Thomas Bateson, of Savannah,Ga. written to his uncle Henry in England on April 23, 1873, on the business stationary.
In this letter he says he has taken over the business from his father, and that he has three children, Alice, Georgina Agnes, and Thomas Remington.
I am trying to find out more about this branch of the family. I am visiting in Florida this winter and am planning a trip to Savannah.
Any help you can give me would be appreciated.

*****

Well, this is big news! Sugar and I didn’t know that Georgia’s middle name was Agnes, and that Thomas’s middle name was Remington.

So I went to the ancestry.com tree and edited Georgia Bateson’s name to “Georgia Agnes Bateson”. (“Agnes” as her middle name completely makes sense to me. Her mother’s mother was Agnes.)

And I search ONE MORE TIME.

And there she is.

There’s a family tree online with her name as Georgia Agnes Bateson Lengnick.

And a photo! She belongs to a nice lady in Texas.

Georgia Agnes Bateson Lengnick.

Georgia Agnes Bateson Lengnick.

*****

The last record I had found on Georgia Bateson was in 1880 when she and her sister were in the Episcopal Orphan Home, and also in the Hartridge household that same year. We wondered why the girls didn’t go live with their grandmother Agnes Mann in Beaufort. On the 1880 census, Agnes Mann had grandchildren living with her. Why not these Bateson girls?

We knew, since Georgia and Alice were not buried in the family plot at Laurel Grove, that perhaps they lived. My worry was that they died and there was no one to pay for their interment, and they were lost to a pauper’s grave.

The last record I had found for Georgia’s sister Alice was in the Savannah City Directories in the 1890s, so I thought that Georgia might have died in the 1890’s. Where was she?

Savannah City Directory, 1893, before cropping.

Savannah City Directory, 1893, before cropping.

The 1893 Savannah City Directory. Alice Bateson, boards at 37 Anderson.

The 1893 Savannah City Directory.
Alice Bateson, boards at 37 Anderson.

Now that I know that Georgia was not deceased until 1956, and that she married a man named Albert C. Lengnick, where is she in 1893?

Albert C. Lengnick, bookkeeper for the Mutual Co-operative Association. Resides at 37 Anderson.

Albert C. Lengnick, bookkeeper for the Mutual Co-operative Association. Resides at 37 Anderson.

Why, she’s at 37 Anderson, of course…