Posts Tagged ‘1829’

Archibald Smith of Georgia

September 4, 2019

Here we are again with these Smith people. The subject of today’s post is Archibald Smith, the son of John and Elizabeth Smith. I’ve already written about Archibald’s mother Elizabeth, his sister Mary “Polly” who married Basil Cowper, and his sister Sarah who married Sir James Wright. There are two other sisters, Jane and Elizabeth, and I can’t find out anything about them yet. So we’ll wind up today with Archibald’s will, and then later I’ll post about the father, John Smith.

SmithArchibald Will 1829

In the name of God Amen I Archibald Smith resident of the City of Savannah, State of Georgia being of sound and disposing mind, memory, and understanding; praised be God for the same. Do make this my last will and Testament in the manner and form following — (First) I resign my soul into the hands of Almighty God my Creator humbly hoping for a blessed immortality through the merits and mediation of my blessed Savior and Redeemer Jesus Christ and my body I desire may be decently buried — (Secondly) I will and devise that all my just and lawful debts be first paid And it is my will that my son Archibald Smith (Planter) should have that half lot known by No seven (7) and Lot and buildings No (9) Nine Trustees Garden also (Thirdly) that my daughter Eliza Zubly Smith shall have that Lott :& Buildings No (7) Seven Reynolds Ward and that Lot and buildings to eleven (11) Trustees Gardens — (Fourthly) One Hundred acres of lands (which adjoins Mayor John Screvens tract which I sold to him and others in 1815) was purchased by my son John Joyner Smith and is now owned by him, which constitutes the settlement where I now plant, and the land given to my daughter Mary Gibbes Smith wife of my son John lies immediately adjoining to and just below the settlement tract (Fifthly) I will and desire that the rest and residue of my Estate be equally divided between my son Archd Smith and my daughter Eliza Z. Smith share & share alike in all my estate (Sixthly) And I do hereby constitute and appoint my son Archd Smith my Executor and my daughter Eliza Z. Smith my Execurix to this my last will and Testament. In witness whereof I the said Archd Smith have hereunto set my hand and seal this the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty nine and the (21) Twentyfirst day of July in the City of Savannah State of Georgia

Archd Smith

In presence of

Ralph King

Jacob Cohen

W. T. Williams

Witnesses

Filed this 10 May 1830 Robert N Pooler C. C. O. C. C.

State of Georgia

Chatham County

In the Court of Ordinary

July Term 1830

Present the Honorable Elias Fort, Alexander Telfair, and Patrick Houstoun Justices of the Inferior Court sitting for Ordinary purposes Personally appeared Ralph King one of the subscribing witnesses to the within instrument of writing purporting to be the last will and Testament of Archibald Smith late of the City of Savannah deceased, who being duly sworn deposeth and saith that he was present and did see the said Archibald Smith deceased sign and heard him pronounce publish and declare the said instrument of writing to be and contain his last will and Testament that the said Archibald Smith deceased was at the time of executing the same of sound and disposing mind and memory to the best of this deponents knowledge. That he the deponent and Jacob Cohen and W. T. Williams did subscribe their names as witnesses at the request of the Testator in his presence and in the presence of each other.

Ralph King

Sworn to in Open Court

This 8th July 1830

Robert N. Pooler Clk

July 8th 1830 Then appeared Archibald Smith Executor named in the foregoing last will and Testament of Archd Smith deceased and qualified as such by taking the oath of an Executor as presribed by Law.

Recorded July 30th 1830

Archibald’s son John Joyner Smith was in Beaufort, South Carolina. So I suppose after Hurricane Dorian passes, we’ll head over Beaufort way and poke around.

Because these people will not let me be.

Weakley County, Tennessee County Court Minutes: Luellin Wilkins, 1829

March 14, 2018

Wilkins 1829 Court records0001

Here’s a copy that I have had for almost 20 years of the the Weakley County, Tennessee, County Court Minutes regarding Llewellyn Wilkins. I have straightened the page and outlined the pertinent parts for “Luellin”.

Wilkins 1829 Court records0001

Page 80

William Fitzgerald)     Debt

vs)

John D. Calvert)

This Day came the parties by their attornies and thereupon came a jury of good and lawful men to wit, Benj. Bondurant, Jessie Edmison, Edward Busey, Saml. Morgan, John A.C. Rhoads, John Terrell, William Porch, William Ridgeway, Elijah Stanley, William Willingham, Amasa Parham, & Luellin Wilkins who being duly elected, tried and sworn to the truth to speak, upon the Issue joined, upon their oaths do say that the Defendant is justly indebted to the plaintiff the sum of one hundred and thirty nine Dollars and fifty cents, debt and they do assess his damages to three dollars and ten cents by reason of the detention thereof. It is therefore considered by the court that the Plaintiff recover of the defendant, the aforesaid sum of one hundred and thirty nine Dollars and fifty cents debt, together with the further sum of three dollars and ten cents damages by the jury aforesaid in manner aforesaid, assessed as also his costs, about his suit in this behalf expended &c and that he have execution for the same.

(Issued)

 

Wilkins 1829 Court records0002

Wilkins 1829 Court records0002

Pages 80 and 81

Martin Clayton)     Debt

vs)

Saml. Morgan)

This day came the parties by their attornies and thereupon came a jury of good and lawful men, to wit, Benjamin Bondurant, Jessie Edmison, Edward Busey, John A.C. Rhoads, John Terrell, William Porch, William Ridgeway, Elijah Stanley, William Willingham, Amasa Parham, Luellin Wilkins and John T. Damron who being duly elected, tried and sworn the truth to speak upon the issue joined, upon their oaths, do say that the defendant is justly indebted to the plaintiff the sum of two hundred dollars debt and that they do assess his damages to six Dollars and 45 cents by reason of the detention off sold debt.

It is therefore considered by the court that the plaintiff recover of the Defendant the aforesaid sum of two hundred Dollars debt together with the further sum of six dollars and 45 cents damages by the jury aforesaid in manner aforesaid assessed as also his costs about his suit in this behalf expended and that he have execution for the same &c.

You might have noticed that one of the jurors in the first case becomes the Defendant in the second case. I suspect that this small county was early in its formation, and there were a minimum of “good and lawful men”.

You might wonder why I added both my original copy and my edited copy. You just never know when someone might need an original for their own documentation.