Archive for the ‘Obituaries’ Category

Linked By Lengnicks: Lena Wood Lengnick

March 4, 2015

Edward Jr.’s parents were Emil Edward and Pauline (Lena) Wood Lengnick.

Lena presented a paper to the Clover Club, and you can find a copy of her work, “Beaufort Memoirs” at the Beaufort District Collection in the Beaufort County Library in Beaufort. I’ve published bits from it here on the blog.

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Lengnick, Lena Wood (Mrs. E. E.) (card 1/1)

BG          October 12, 1961              p. 2

Rites Set Tomorrow

For Mrs. Lengnick

Funeral services for Mrs. E.

E. (Lena Wood) Lengnick, 81,

who died Sunday in Savannah,

will be held at 4 p.m. tomorrow

from the Carteret Street Metho-

dist Church, conducted by the

Rev. R. S. Kaney and the Rev.

John W. Hardy of the Episco-

pal Church. Burial will be in

the St. Helena Churchyard.

A native of Aiken, she mov-

ed to Beaufort inn 1904 and was

active in the Methodist Church,

the Clover Club, and a garden

club. The late Mr. Lengnick died

in 1942. He was a businessman.

Surviving are two sons, L. W.

Lengnick of Honolulu, Hawaii,

and C. Alfred Lengnick of

Beaufort; a sister, Mrs. Susie

A. Brigham of Augusta, Ga.;

three granddaughters, two

great-granddaughters, two great

grandsons, two nephews and

three nieces.

Morrall Funeral Home is in

charge of funeral arrangements.

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Linked by Lengnicks

February 28, 2015

If you’ve been following the story of Georgia Bateson, an orphan of Savannah, you’ll know that we’ve been solving her life story from 1870-1956. We learned that she married Albert Carl Lengnick.

So now we want to know more about the Lengnicks, a Beaufort family who was originally from Germany.

I found several old obituaries in the obituary card file at the Beaufort County Library in the Beaufort District Collection.

Georgia and her husband moved away from Beaufort, but he still had Lengnick family in the area.

I’ll start with this obituary for his nephew. When we found the Lengnick plot at St. Helena’s churchyard, I wondered why he died so young.

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Lengnick, Edward E., Jr.

BG     P.4     September 17, 1925

*****

EDWARD LENGNICK

COMMITTED SUICIDE

*****

Beaufort Boy, Very Popular at

Key West, Fla., Where He

Worked, Left Dispondent

Note.

*****

Key West, Fla., Sept 17.—(Spe-

cial.)—Edward E. Lengnick, Jr., age

22, employed as solicitor in sales de-

partment of the Key West Electric

Company, committed suicide here at

8 o’clock on Monday morning, by

shooting himself in the head at his

room in the Kweco Inn, where he had

been residing along with other em-

ploys of the company since coming

to Key West about two years ago.

Lengnick left a note which read:

“Something is and has been eating

my heart and soul away for some

time. Life has become unbearable

and I am unable to stand the mental

agony any longer. Edward, Jr.”

No other apparent reason was

given for the act.

Young Lengnick was quite popu-

lar in this community and was held

in high esteem by his associates and

many other acquaintances.

*****

Young Lengnick, son of Mr. and

Mrs. E. E. Lengnick, this city, was

buried here in St. Helena’s church-

yard Wednesday afternoon at 5

o’clock.

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Lengnick

 

Lengnick, Edward, Jr.

BG    P.4      September 24, 1925

*****

EDWARD LENGNICK, Jr.

WAS CHARMING YOUTH

*****

Just a tribute to this dear young

fellow who has left so many friends

to mourn his loss.

A general favorite from his baby-

hood he indeed leaves a void among

the young people with whom he was

associated so closely, and also to his

older friends who held him so dear.

Although making his home in an-

other place since manhood, his visits

were always occasions of pleasure to

Beaufortonians, and Edward was

always a welcome guest; his cordial

manner and charming personality en-

dearing him to all with whom he

came in contact.

Graduating at the Beaufort High

School, he was selected president and

valedictorian of the class of 1918, and

a bright and promising future seemed

assured. But his health became im-

paired while a student at the Georgia

School of Technology, and, when he

returned home a sick boy, it was re-

alized he was no longer his buoyant,

cheerful self. From that time on-

ward, he made a brave fight against

heavy odds; but the conflict was too

long and too hard, and on the 17th

of September he left this painful life

to enter the rest of Paradise where he

longed to be.

His remains were brought to Beau-

fort and laid to rest in the church-

yard of old St. Helena’s, of which he

was a member from childhood. The

services in the church were conducted

by the rector, Rev. Maynard Marshall,

assisted by the Rev. Mr. Kirkland of

the Methodist church. The pallbear-

ers were selected from his friends, all

in the height of young manhood, who

tenderly laid their comrade to rest

under quantities of flowers sent to

his bereaved family, to whom the

sympathy of an entire community is

given.

There in the family burial lot he

sleeps his last long sleep, while we,

secure in the thought that we can

never drift beyond God’s love and

care, know that—

“All Souls are Thine: we must not say

That those are dead who pass away

From this our world of flesh set free

We know them living unto Thee.”

“H.”

 

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Good night, Edward. We’re here, and we’re thinking about you.

 

The Gold Mine in the Closet: Samuel Hopkins Adams

November 25, 2014

Sugar said that a famous author named Samuel Hopkins Adams would rent the house that his grandfather built.  He rented it in the wintertime, which is what we call a snowbird.

Honestly, a famous author?  Who just happened to live in your step-grandmother’s house?

This particular house was built in 1937-1938, overlooking Battery Creek.

After Sugar’s grandfather died, the house stayed occupied by Sugar’s step-grandmother.  She took a job during the winter months up north at a college, and rented her house out to Samuel Hopkins Adams.

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While we were collecting obituaries at the Beaufort County Library’s Beaufort District Collection, we found the obituary for Samuel Hopkins Adams.

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He wasn’t just a children’s book author. He also was a newspaperman who wrote a series of articles for Collier’s magazine which were largely responsible for the enactment of the pure food and drug act.

What does this have to do with the gold mine in the closet?

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This book in particular as mentioned in the obituary…

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027

 

Inscribed for Lawton Bateson,

With the compliments of the author.

Samuel Hopkins Adams

May 1st, 1957

The Gold Mine in the Closet: Gulie Lawton Read

November 14, 2014

Guilielma Lawton married Abram Carrington Read.  She lived her whole life in Savannah.

004

MRS. GUILIELMA
LAWTON READ DIES
*****
Was Well Known and Was Popular
With Many Friends.
The death early this morning of Mrs. Guilielma Lawton Read, wife of Abram C. Read, removes a widely loved Savannahian, who spent her entire life here and claimed a vast host of friends who grieve for her.
Mrs. Read was the daughter of Dr. William S. Lawton and Mrs. Elizabeth Jones Lawton. The latter was the daughter of the well-known Georgian, Seaborn Jones. She was also the niece of the late Gen. Alexander R. Lawton. During her youth she lived in the old Lawton home on Lafayette Square, which was one of the social centers of the community, well known for its representative gatherings. She claimed an unusually large circle of friends whose devotion increased during the latter years of her life when her long illness was a source of grief to so many.
Always cheerful and possessing a lovable and charming personality, she was especially admired for her cheerful spirit and fortitude during her illness. A communicant of Christ Church, she was a devoted and active member. She possessed a beautiful Christian nature.
Mrs. Read is survived by her husband, Aaron (sic) C. Read; one daughter, Miss Anne Read, and one sister, Mrs. Emily Lawton Garrard.
The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 4 o’clock from the residence, 118 East Thirty-fifth street, with private interment in the Lawton-Jones vault at Laurel Grove Cemetery. Rev. David Cady Wright, rector of Christ Church, will conduct the services.
The active pallbearers will be Charles Ellis, Wymberley W. DeRenne, T. Mayhew Cunningham, Jr., George E. Cope, Charlton M. Theus and Frank S. Mackall.
The honorary pallbearers will be J. Randolph Anderson, W. W. Mackall, P. A. Stovall, J. Florance Minis, C. T. Airey and W. D. Judkins.

The obituary mentions that she is buried at the Lawton-Jones vault in Laurel Grove. That’s where Sugar and I trimmed up the crape myrtles last year.  We didn’t know she was there because we didn’t have a list of occupants.  The obituary alsos states that she is the niece of the General Alexander Robert Lawton. He has died more than 30 years prior to Gulie’s death, but people still knew who he was.  He married Sarah Alexander, and one of their children was Corinne Elliott Lawton, whose life and death has caused so much stir here on this blog.

You can read the mention of Gulie in Sarah Alexander Lawton’s diary by clicking here. When I first read Sarah Alexander Lawton’s diary last year, I didn’t know who Gulie Lawton was.  I knew that she had to be related to Sugar somehow, and, like it sometimes happens, the answer comes to me if I wait long enough.  And also if I prod and poke about with a stick.

Before I had transcribed the obituary, I had seen mention in the city directories that Gulie and Abram’s daughter Anne had married Dr. Thomas Charlton and they were all living at 118 East 35th Street.  So we thought that Anne and Thomas had built the house at East 35th and that Gulie and Abram had moved in with them.  According to the obituary, it looks like it was the other way around, since the funeral procession left from the residence at East 35th, and there was no mention that Gulie had been living at her daughter’s residence.

Driving by now.

We turned the corner, and OHMYWORD.  This house is seriously jaw-dropping.

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We’re at the corner of Abercorn and East 35th Street.

There’s a sign on the corner of the property that this is a business.  It appears that the house is used for offices now, and I’m guessing they are fairly grand offices.  Sugar seems to remember that Gulie’s husband sold his business, and the same name appears on the sign.

This kind of capital leads us to believe that somehow, somewhere, there are photos of this family.

Perhaps I need to get out my stick.

The Gold Mine in the Closet: The Children of William Seabrook Lawton & Elizabeth Jones Lawton

November 12, 2014

Sugar’s mother’s father was Major Edward Percival Lawton, 1863-1929.

Edward Percival Lawton

Edward Percival Lawton

010

The back of the photo

Edward was the only son of Dr. William Seabrook Lawton and Elizabeth “Bessie” Jones Lawton.  We haven’t found a photo of Dr. William yet.

Mrs. Dr. William Seabrook Lawton, in the late 1800's.

Mrs. Dr. William Seabrook Lawton, in the late 1800’s.

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Mary Lawton, 1864-1902, who married William Urquhart Garrard. This photo was most probably made at the Lawton House on Abercorn Street in Savannah, Georgia, about 1884.

After Mary Lawton Garrard died, William Urquhart Garrard married Mary’s sister, Emily Lawton Screven.

Emily Lawton Screven Garrard, 1862-1932.

Emily Lawton Screven Garrard, 1862-1932.

We find no photos of Guilielma Lawton Read, 1866-1929.  There may have been another child born to this family, according to a census in 1870, possibly named Ellen G., born about 1868.  There’s also a Jane G., born about 1866 or 1867 – I believe that this is Guilielma.

We do, however, find her obituary.

004

MRS. GUILIELMA
LAWTON READ DIES
*****
Was Well Known and Was Popular
With Many Friends.
The death early this morning of Mrs. Guilielma Lawton Read, wife of Abram C. Read, removes a widely loved Savannahian, who spent her entire life here and claimed a vast host of friends who grieve for her.
Mrs. Read was the daughter of Dr. William S. Lawton and Mrs. Elizabeth Jones Lawton. The latter was the daughter of the well-known Georgian, Seaborn Jones. She was also the niece of the late Gen. Alexander R. Lawton. During her youth she lived in the old Lawton home on Lafayette Square, which was one of the social centers of the community, well known for its representative gatherings. She claimed an unusually large circle of friends whose devotion increased during the latter years of her life when her long illness was a source of grief to so many.
Always cheerful and possessing a lovable and charming personality, she was especially admired for her cheerful spirit and fortitude during her illness. A communicant of Christ Church, she was a devoted and active member. She possessed a beautiful Christian nature.
Mrs. Read is survived by her husband, Aaron (sic) C. Read; one daughter, Miss Anne Read, and one sister, Mrs. Emily Lawton Garrard.
The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 4 o’clock from the residence, 118 East Thirty-fifth street, with private interment in the Lawton-Jones vault at Laurel Grove Cemetery. Rev. David Cady Wright, rector of Christ Church, will conduct the services.
The active pallbearers will be Charles Ellis, Wymberley W. DeRenne, T. Mayhew Cunningham, Jr., George E. Cope, Charlton M. Theus and Frank S. Mackall.
The honorary pallbearers will be J. Randolph Anderson, W. W. Mackall, P. A. Stovall, J. Florance Minis, C. T. Airey and W. D. Judkins.

A little light sleuthing on ancestry.com shows us that her daughter Anne Read married Thomas Charlton, and that they lived at 118 East Thirty-fifth Street, the same address as in the obituary.  Do we drive by?

You already know the answer…

 

Five Years! And an Obituary for Robert Neighbors

July 20, 2014

Robert Neighbors married Agnes Mann, but not the Agnes Mann I’ve been talking about.  This Agnes is a granddaughter of the original Agnes Mann of Baden, Germany, and Beaufort, South Carolina.

003

 

Funeral services for Robert

Matthew Neighbors, 55, were

conducted Friday afternoon

from Carteret Street Methodist

church, with interment in the

Beaufort National Cemetery.

The Rev. George F. Kirby offi-

ciated.

Mr. Neighbors died unexpect-

edly at his residence at Hun-

dred Pines, Beaufort, Thursday

morning.  He was a native of

Elizabethtown, Ky. and had

lived in Beaufort 26 years.  He

retired from the Navy after

many years of active service.

Survivors, his widow, the

former Miss Agnes Mann, of

Beaufort; a daughter Mrs.

Charles W. Martin of Normon,

Okla., a son, James D. Neigh-

bors, a student at Clemson col-

lege, and a sister, Mrs. Milton

Sewell, of Baltimore, Md.

 

(From the Beaufort Gazette, March 30, 1950.)

Ferdinand S. Mann, 1905-September 30,1966

June 30, 2014

MannVariousObits 001

 

 

FERDINAND S. MANN

Ferdinand S. Mann, 61, son of

the late Caroline S. Mann and

Daniel Mann, died at his home

in Berkely Springs, W. Va.,

Sept. 30.

Survivors include his widow

Georgia Mann; one sister, Mrs.

Leon S. Carter of Beaufort; one

brother, Muse E. Mann of Col-

umbus, Ga.

Mann was retired from Civil

Service in Washington, D. C.,

and had made his home in

Berkely Springs.

Funeral services were Sun-

day, Oct. 2, in Berkely Springs.

(From the Beaufort Gazette, October 6, 1966)

 

Henry G. Mann, 1849-1898

June 27, 2014

MannVariousObits 001 (2)

 

 

After an illness extending over some

months from Bright’s disease, Mr. Henry

G. Mann, long and favorably known and

having many friends, died at the residence

of his mother, in Beaufort, Tuesday.  The

funeral services were conducted by Rev. W.

L. Githens, in St. Helena Church, yester-

day morning, in the presence of a large

number of sympathizing friends, and the

remains were interred in the family lot.

The pall bearers were Messrs. H. T. Danner,

M. O’D. White, J. M. Baker, M. D. Boin-

eau, J. N. Wallace and D. W. Crocker.

Besides a most affectionate and aged moth-

er, deceased left two brothers and several

sisters to mourn his loss.  Mr. Mann was

about 49 years of age and had been engaged

in mercantile business all his life.

 

In Search Of Lawtons & Basingers: The Obituary of William Starr, January 27, 1858

June 14, 2013

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JANUARY 27, 1858.

WEDNESDAY MORNING, JAN. 27TH

THEIR LIFE’S JOURNEY ENDED.  Today

again we have the sad duty of noting the de-

cease of two more of our citizens – men esteem-

ed in life, and now that “their eyes are dim and

their cheeks are wan,” their goodness of heart

will be cherished among the friends they have

left behind them.

Yesterday one of our oldest citizens, Mr. Wm

Starr, sunk to that sleep which knows no wak-

ing, in the 93rd year of his age.  He was a man

highly esteem for his gentle and courteous

manner and strict integrity.  Mr. Starr was a

native of Wilmington, Del., but has been a re-

sident of Savannah for the last 60 years.  He

was appointed inspector in the Custom House

in 1829, which office he held up to his death .

We believe that at the time of his death Mr.

Starr was the oldest resident in Chatham

County.

We are also grieved to notice the decease in

prime of manhood, of Dr. Francis H. Demere,

health physician of this port, which occurred

yesterday.  He was a gentleman esteemed by

all who knew him, in the social or professional

circles, and one of those men of integrity

whom a community grieve to lose.

*****

This obituary was almost the last thing in the William Starr Basinger Family Papers.  William Starr Basinger’s mother was Jane Starr Basinger, the recipient of most of the letters in the file, and it appears that everything in the file was her personal collection.

William Starr, the subject of the obituary, was Jane Starr Basinger’s father.