Archive for the ‘Obituaries’ Category

More Newspapers: GenealogyBank

October 28, 2017

I’m reading newspapers.com and Chronicling America, if by “reading” you understand that I am lying down poking at the iPhone.

I realize that there are still a lot of papers and time frames that aren’t online. But I’m confused. I’ve seen other folks post things from the Charleston newspaper on a Charleston history FB group. Why can’t I find the same things! It hit me. There must be another online database where I can throw some money.

Let’s ask our friend, Ms. Google. She knows everything.

GenealogyBank.

Friendly reader and historian Lynda  provided the first search terms for John Stoney who died on Hilton Head Island in 1821. His obit is on genealogybank in the Charleston Courier. Plus 5k more search returns.

Let’s try Agnes Mann. I have an obit for her already from the Beaufort paper from 1906.

From the State newspaper in Columbia, SC, July 17, 1906:

DEATH OF MRS. AGNES MANN.

 

Native of Germany Dies at Her Beaufort Home.

Special to The State.

Beaufort, July 16 — Mrs. Agnes Mann died on Saturday in her 78th year after an illness of three months.

The funeral services were held at St. Helena church on Sunday afternoon and were conducted by Rev. J. W. Campbell. The pallbearers were Messrs W. F. Mancher, W. R. Bristol, H. M. Stuart, Jr., W. J. Thomas, R. R. Legare and J. M. Lengnick.

Mrs. Mann, whose maiden name was Agnes Reese, was born in 1828 at Meintz, a German town situated on the banks of the Rhine. There she married Daniel Mann and with him came to Beaufort in 1848. Here she has lived ever since, taking an active part in charitable and church work. For 56 years she has been a member of St. Helena church. Until recently she took part in the beneficent work of the Ladies’ Charitable Aid society. Her cheerful, sweet, benignant personality and influence will be missed by a wide circle of friends.

Mrs. Mann is survived by two daughters, Mrs. L. C. Scheper and Miss Emily Mann, and by one son, Mr. Daniel Mann, and by 23 grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Mr. Daniel Mann, her husband, was a Confederate soldier and fought through the war in the B. V. A. He died March 17, 1872.

I knew that she was from Eltville, Germany, from the records at the Laurel Grove Cemetery. Now I have another place to search in Meintz where she married her husband Daniel.

I might have to call out of work.

Tracking Deaderick A. Collins

September 24, 2017

Recently I learned that my 2xgreat-grandfather Deaderick A. Collins was killed in a train accident.

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DNA cousin Nick found this on google books.

Then I found a newspaper account of the accident at the East Tennessee Historical Society in Knoxville. The following clipping is from the Knoxville Chronicle.

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Yesterday afternoon the down passenger train ran over a cow, a mile east of Sweetwater, which threw the engine and express car from the track, badly wrecking both and causing the death of the fireman, D. A. Collins. The express messenger, J. J. Tibbs, was injured slightly, but beyond these no one else was hurt.

Mr. Collins’ death is universally regretted by his friends. He leaves a wife and three children. His remains were expected to arrive this morning, and will probably be interred this afternoon.

 

Then when I searched the internet again, I found that the Knoxville Chronicle was online at newspapersDOTcom. Of course. Why wouldn’t a historical newspaper be there. I had used a free trial last year, but found nothing that helped my searches. This was surely the year to find *something*. Anything.

So I signed up for 6 months, thinking that this is surely a big enough window.

I found the initial story that I first published, the one from the Knoxville Chronicle. And then found another from The Sweetwater Enterprise, October 5, 1871, Thursday, Page 3.

I also learned that you can “clip” an article from any paper and save it to your computer in the form of a PDF, which you will find below. I’ll transcribe it for your viewing pleasure.

Deaderick_A__Collins__10_2_1871__death_in_railroad_accident

TERRIBLE ACCIDENT.

*****

Train Thrown from the Track.

*****

The Fireman Instantly Killed.

*****

Express Messenger Injured.

*****

A terrible accident occurred to the

westward bound train on the E. T. Va.,

& Ga., Railroad on Monday evening last,

while rounding a curve about a half a

mile East of Sweetwater. The accident

took place about 3:25, and at a point

of the road where the best cattle belong-

ing to Mr. Wm. Cleveland, cross it every

morning and evening.

The train ran over two of the cattle

which upset the engine, tender, baggage

and express car, tearing up the track for

some distance, and wrecking the engine

and cars in a manner beyond description.

Mr. D. A. Collins, the fireman, jumped

from the engine, and before he could get

out of the way, the tender upset, fell up-

on him, mangling him in a most horrible

manner, killing him instantly. The en-

gineer, Mr. Wiley Wright, miraculously

escaped injury. The Express Messenger,

Mr. Tibbs, was slightly injured.

The scene of the disaster was terrible.

The right side of Mr. Collins, from his

hip down, crushed to pieces, his jaw bone

broken and his body bruised almost all

over. His body was taken from under

the debris in about two hours from the

time the accident occurred, was washed,

dressed, placed in a box and brought here

to the depot.

The track was cleared at about 11

o’clock, allowing all the night trains to

pass on time.

The body of the deceased was conveyed

to Knoxville, on the night train where

lives his family, consisting of a wife, three

small children and a sister who were sole-

ly dependent upon him for support.

Now, I’m not a doctor or a coroner, but I *have* watched a few crime shows. (Don’t laugh – y’all have, too.) If he was killed instantly, how did bruises have time to form over his whole body? Doesn’t the bruising mean that he was still alive while trapped under the wreckage?

Then Nick found another account in another paper in Chronicling America. I found this on NewspapersDOTcom and clipped it and downloaded it. This is from a Jonesborough, Tennessee, newspaper called the Herald and Tribune, and the article is from October 5, 1871, Thursday, page 2.

Deaderick_Collins__death__1871__reported_in_newspaper_in_Jonesborough__Tennessee_

Railroad Accident.

We take the following from the Knox-

ville Press and Herald, of Tuesday last:

Quite a serious accident occured to the

westward bound train on the E. T.,Va.&

Ga. Railroad, which left this city at 1:17

p. m., yesterday, while rounding a curve

about a quarter of a mile east of Sweet-

water, and forty-two miles west of Knox-

ville. The accident took place at 3:25

p. m., and at a point of the Road where

the cows of the village cross it every morn-

ing and evening in going to and returning

from pasturage.

The train ran over a cow and the mis-

hap upset the engine, tender and express

car, instantly killing the fireman, Mr. D.

A. Collins, who was caught under the

tender and crushed to death. His body

was still under the debris at eight o’clock

last night. The engineer, Mr. Wiley

Wright, escaped injury. The Express

Messenger, Mr Tibbs, was slightly hurt.

The engine, tender and express car were

badly smashed up.

Mr. Collins, the fireman, leaves a wife

and three children, who reside in this city,

on Depot street, between Broad and

Crozier streets. He was about thirty-

eight years of age.

*****

So where was the accident: 1/4 mile, 1/2 mile, or 1 mile east of Sweetwater?

Who is Deaderick’s sister who depends on him for sole support?

Was it one cow on the tracks? Or two?

If the accident occurred at 3:25PM, was the body removed about 2 hours later from under the wreckage, putting that about 5:25ish, or was the body still under the wreckage at 8PM like the last story states?

AND WHERE IS THIS MAN BURIED? Somewhere in Knoxville, we trust, but where? The oldest church in Knoxville reports that he is not buried there, but they are using the headstones, which have been surveyed and recorded, as reference, and apparently do not have paper records from 1871.

And was he really 38 years old? Because some records say he would be 30ish.

Really, I’m so glad to know that he is not a mystery person any more, and that he was a real flesh-and-blood man.

Most of all, I’d like to know why there wasn’t a cowcatcher?

The Curious Court Case of Ruth A. Collins vs. East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railroad Company: The Death of Deaderick Collins

September 16, 2017

I first learned about Ruth Collins in 1999. I had decided to learn more about my genealogy, but all I knew on my maternal side was that my great-grandmother was named Henrietta Collins Webb. I found her as a child on the 1880 Blount County, Tennessee, census. Her mother was Ruth Collins. I was sure I had the right family when I saw that the mother’s name was Ruth. You might think the same if you were named for your grandmother, and she was perhaps named for HER grandmother, so it stood to reason that this must be my family.

Ruth Collins was listed as a widow. My BigBroBob was also researching this family, and he had seen a message on the ancestry message boards from a man named Harry who was searching for his grandmother Ivy’s father Deaderick Collins. But Ivy was born in 1881, so this didn’t seem like the same family even though Ivy’s mother was named Ruth. I suppose that we could have stretched the imagination by reasoning that Ivy was born in early 1881, and that Deaderick had died right before the census was taken. That seemed possible, except that Ivy had a younger brother Joseph born about 1883. Surely this was not the same family.

There’s also an 1870 census for Knoxville Tennessee which showed Henrietta and her little sister Maude living with their parents Ruth and D. A. Collins, and D. A. is a railroad hand. So let’s guess that the 1870 family is definitely mine.

That was it. I never found anything more that D. A. was Deaderick.

*****

Fast forward 18 years, and I’ve taken a DNA test. In April 2017 I matched a man named Nick. He was descended through my Henrietta’s sister Maude, but didn’t have any info on Ruth or Deaderick or their life together.

*****

About 2 weeks ago, I received a message from Nick with a link to a google book search. It was about a case that was reported in a book “Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Tennessee, Volume 56”.  Nick used the search term “Deaderick A. Collins”.

The name of the case was Ruth A. Collins v. East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railroad Co.

Here’s a screenshot:


And then the suit names Deaderick AND WHERE AND HOW HE DIED.

 

The defendant appeals in error from a judgment of the Circuit Court of Knox county, upon a verdict of six thousand dollars ($6,000) damages assessed by the jury for killing Deaderick Collins, the husband of the plaintiff. The accident which occasioned the death of said Deaderick Collins, occurred on the 2nd of October, 1871. He was a fireman on the defendant’s train, which, on that day, ran over some cattle, whereby the engine and tender were thrown from the track, and the tender upsetting fell upon said Collins killing him instantly.

The action is brought by the widow, under the Act of 1871, ch. 78, which is in the words following: “Be it enacted, &c., that Section 2291 of the Code of Tennessee, be so amended as to provide that the right of action, which a person, who died from injuries received from another, or whose death is caused b the wrongful act, omission, or killing by another, would have had against the wrongdoer in case death had no ensued, shall not abate or be extinguished by the death; but shall pass to his widow; and, in case there is no widow, to his children or to his personal representative, for the benefit of his widow or next of kin, free from the claims of his creditors.”

This Act took effect and was approved by the Governor on the 14th of December, 1871, two months and twelve days after the death of the said Deaderick Collins.

Sugar weighed in on this topic. Wouldn’t there be, he reasoned, a family story of a train accident in which your ancestor DIED? Wouldn’t there be an oral tradition that there were some children whose father was reported to be Deaderick, but clearly couldn’t be since he was DECEASED? I vote no because I have met my family, and I know how we roll.

It just so happens that I was already planning a trip to East Tennessee to attend the 150th anniversary of the church that I grew up in. I had already requested time off, enough time off that I could view the Lawton collection in Columbia, SC, plus spend the night with a Collins cousin, attend the reunion, visit Mom and Dad at the cemtery, go to the Knox County Archives, and visit with friends. This was a golden opportunity.

Then a hurricane appeared. I was planning on the trip anyway, but the trip might be dicey with a possible evacuation. The hurricane cooperated by moving westward.

At the Knox County Archives, it just so happened that the court case was on microfilm. These are iPhone photos of the microfilm.

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Ruth A Collins vs The ET Va & Ga RR Co

No 8929 February 14, 1874

Came the parties by their attornies and came also a Jury to wit, JH Mynatt, JA Ogg, Jefferson Jett, Wash Morrow, HC Ogg, JC Chiles, JC Johnson, JR Johnson, JP Ford, John Sayne, WL Kennedy and JW Ventis all good and lawful men citizens of Knox County, who having been tried elected and sworn well and truly to try the issues joined between the parties having heard all the testimony in the cause and a portion of the arguments of counsel from rendering a Verdict are respited until the meeting of court Monday morning next.

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No 8929 February 16, 1874

Came the parties by their attornies and came also the jury heretofore Sworn in this cause to wit JH Mynatt, JA Ogg, Jefferson Jett, Wash Morrow, HC Ogg, JC Chiles, JC Johnson, JR Johnson, John Sayne, WL Kennedy, and JW Ventis, who having heard the remainder of the arguments of counsel, from rendering a verdict are again further respited until the meeting of court tomorrow morning.

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No 8929 February 17, 1874

Came the parties by the attornies and came also the Jury heretofore sworn in this cause to wit JH Mynatt, JA Ogg, Jefferson Jett, Wash Morrow, HC Ogg, JC Chiles, JC Johnson, JR Johnson,  JA Finch, John Sayne, WL Kennedy, and JW Ventes who upon their oaths do say that they find the matter in favor of the plaintiff and assess the Plaintiff damages by reason of the premises in the Declaration mentioned at the Sum of Six thousand dollars. It is therefore considered by the court that the Plaintiff have and recover of the defendant the Said Sum of Six thousand dollars the damages assessed by the jury together with all the costs of this cause for which execution may issue.

 

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No 8929 February 19, 1874

Came the defendant by attorney and entered a Motion for a new trial of this cause.

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February 21, 1874

Came the parties by their attornies and came on for hearing the defendants motion for a new trial of this cause which motion having been argued by counsel and considered of and well understood by the Court it is considered by the court that the motion be overruled and a new trial refused.

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Tuesday March 3rd 1874

Court met pursuant to adjournment

Present and Presiding

The Hon. E.T. Hall Judge &c.

Came the defendant by attorney and (illegible) an appeal in the nature of a writ of (illegible) to the next term of the Supreme Court of Tennessee to be holden at Knoxville on the Second Monday of September next from the actions of the court in refusing to grant a new trial of this cause. And tendered to the Court its bill of exceptions which is signed and sealed by the Court and ordered to be made a part of the record in this cause. And the Defendant having entered into bond with Security as required by law Said appeal is granted.

Here’s a fun fact: Ruth’s Supreme Court case was to be heard on the “Second Monday of September”. I viewed this court case on microfilm on the second Monday of September, after traveling about 500 miles to view it.

The upshot of all this? Ruth and her attorney sued the railroad. There was a jury of men. She won. The railroad wanted an appeal, which was first denied, then granted, and the case went on to the Tennessee State Supreme Court. She won again, although the physical record cannot be located.

If there was a railroad accident, wouldn’t that be in the newspaper? I asked this question at the East Tennessee Historical Society, and spent a good bit of time scrolling through the microfilm.

Microfilm of the Knoxville Chronicle, October 4, 1871

Yesterday afternoon the down passenger train ran over a cow, a mile east of Sweetwater, which threw the engine and express car from the track, badly wrecking both and causing the death of the fireman, D. A. Collins. The express messenger, J. J. Tibbs, was injured slightly, but beyond these no one else was hurt.

Mr. Collins’ death is universally regretted by his friends. He leaves a wife and three children. His remains were expected to arrive this morning, and will probably be interred this afternoon.

Now I need a map of the Sweetwater area of the ETVGRR in 1871, and I need to find where this man was buried, most probably in Knoxville.

*****

I spent the next night with my long-time friend Susan who lives near Sweetwater. When I headed home the next day for cats and Carolina, I drove over a bridge that crossed the East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railroad. I took a quick look east to the direction of the accident.

Ruth went on to have 4 children after Deaderick’s death.

Good night, Deaderick. I’m thinking about you.

Little Lawton Garrard, 1892-1899

March 27, 2016

Lawton was the 4th child born to Mary Robert Lawton Garrard and William Garrard, and the second to die in childhood. The first child, Bessie, died at 1 year when her mother was about 6 months pregnant with the 2nd child William. William lived to adulthood and married and had children.

Lawton did not.

 

FUNERAL INVITATIONS. GARRARD. – The relatives and friends of Mr. and Mrs. William Garrard are invited to attend the funeral of their son, Lawton, at 11 o’clock this morning from their residence, 202 Gwinnett street, east. (Newspaper article courtesy of Emily Garrard from the Savannah Morning News, April 21, 1899.)

Garrard0003

Image courtesy of Emily Garrard.

He was 6 years and 6 months old when he died of dysentery. He left behind his parents, and his siblings, William Jr., Gulielma, Emily, and Cecelia.

Mary Robert Lawton

March 15, 2016

Sugar’s cousin Emily has a collection of research about the Lawton and Garrard connection. She loaned me a BOX of stuff. (Should I tell you that she gave me this box a year ago Christmas? Probably not. You might think I’m a slacker, but I’m merely a proCRAFTinator.)

So here we have 4 pages of newspaper articles. The first three are from the same article that wouldn’t fit onto one sheet, which reports her wedding on Thursday, July 14, 1887. The newspaper is The Morning News: Friday, July 15, 1887.

The fourth is her death notice, also from The Morning News: Saturday, October 11, 1902.

A VERY PRETTY WEDDING.

Christ Church the Scene of an Interesting Social Event.

Miss Mary Robert Lawton, daughter of Dr. W. S. Lawton, and Col. William Garrard were married at Christ church at 7 o’clock last evening, by Rev. Dr. Strong. The church was brilliantly lighted and decorated with a profusion of flowers and floral ornaments. Some time before the hour for the ceremony the guests began to arrive, and within a few minutes the church was nearly filled with the friends of Miss Lawton and Col. Garrard. The bridal party assembled in the rear of the church, and as the organist began the wedding march — from Tannheuser — the ushers led the way to the altar. Messrs. Thomas Screven and Josehp (sic) Cumming in front, followed by Messrs. A. Minis, Jr., and A. Boyd. Behind them were Misses Emmie Lawton and Maud Thomas, and they were followed at regular intervals of about ten feet by Messrs. Grimes and W. W. Williamson, Misses V. Minis and Gulie Lawton, Messrs. W. Cumming and S. A. Wood, Misses Bessie Martin and LeHardy, Messrs. George W. Owen and R. L. Mercer, Misses L. N. Hill and Ruth Stewart, Messrs. T. P. Ravenel and Edward Lawton. Misses Nannie Stewart and Elise Heyward, Messrs. A.M. Martin, Jr., and H. H. Thomas, Misses Viva Taylor and Clelia Elliott, and Messrs. W. N. Pratt and John S. Schley. Col. Garrard and Miss Lawton came last. As the bridesmaids reached the steps of the choir floor they separated, standing on either side, and the groomsmen continued on and formed a semi-circle around the outer edge of the choir floor. After the bride and groom had reached the altar the bridesmaids followed, and formed another semi-circle between the bridal pair and the groomsmen..Dr. Strong then proceeded with the ceremony, and Dr. Lawton gave away the bride. The ceremony being concluded, Col. and Mrs. Garrard led the way down the aisle, and the bridesmaids and groomsmen followed, the bridesmaids walking with their respective groomsmen instead of together as they entered.

“Midsummer’s Night Dream” was played as the party moved from the church and entered the carriages. The programme was beautifully arranged and successfully carried out. The bride’s dress was of white silk, trimmed with pearls and lace. On her head she wore a wreath of orange blossoms and in her hand she carried a magnificent bouquet of white rosebuds. The bridesmaids were all in white, their dresses being of mull and their sashes of watered silk.

At the residence of the bride’s parents, Dr. and Mrs. W. S. Lawton, on Lafayette square, the reception was held. The parlors were filled with friends and a delightful evening was spent. Many elegant toilets were noticeable. The wedding presents were numerous and exquisite, and many of them very costly. The most beautiful of them all, perhaps, was the punch bowl, waiter and ladle, presented by the Savannah Volunteer Guards. The set is of sterling silver, from original designs of the most elegant and artistic character. The bowl, holding two gallons, stands upon a convoluted base, the graceful outline continuing to its edge, a graceful curve, meeting a frieze four inches wide, the surface of which was worked up by hand into a procession of infant Bacchuses celebrating a vineyard feast. The beautifully turned edge of oxidized silver meets the lining of gold.The waiter has a satin-finished surface and an oxidized silver edge two inches wide, and in the centre is the coat-of-arms of the Guards. The ladle is the crowning piece of artistic work. From the bowl springs a vine, and upon the handle sits Bacchus himself, holding this, his goblet. The gift was made here in Savannah by Theus & Co.

The bride and groom withdrew from the reception at 8:30 o’clock to prepare for their wedding tour. They will be entertained this morning by Col. Garrard’s mother, at a wedding breakfast at her home in Columbus, Ga. Their wedding tour will include Chicago, Denver and other Western cities, and may extend to California. They expect to be absent about four months.

 

MRS. GARRARD DEAD.

The End Came at an Early Hour This Morning.

Mrs. William Garrard died at 3 o’clock this morning at the Savannah Hospital from the result of an operation, after a lingering illness of eight weeks. The end had been expected for some time, and yesterday all hopes for her recovery were lost, when, in the morning, she began to sink rapidly.

Mrs. Garrard was a daughter of the late Dr. W. S. Lawton, her maiden name being Mary Lawton. Fifteen years ago, in Christ Church, then 22 years of age, she was married to Col. William Garrard. She was a devoted member of Christ Church. She manifested deep interest in patriotic societies, being a daughter of the American Revolution and a Colonial Dame.

Mrs. Garrard was a woman whose lovable disposition made her near and dear to all who knew her. Of sound sense and judgment, and possessing great energy, she won friends by her true heartedness and genial disposition wherever she moved. She was generally loved by all who knew her, and her death is a sad shock to the entire community.

Mrs. Garrard leaves a husband and four children. She also has living a brother, Capt. Ed. Lawton, U. S. A., who is at present detailed to military duty at one of the military schools in Pennsylvania, and two sisters, Mrs. Thomas Screven and Mrs. Carrington Reed of Nashville.

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Mary Lawton – 20 years old. Most probably taken about 1885. Photo courtesy of Sugar’s Gold Mine in the Closet

Linked By Lengnicks: Charles A. Lengnick, the Patriarch

March 15, 2015

Scan0001

Scan0001 (3)

Lengnick, Charles A.        (card 1/2)

PP           June 4, 1903       p. 2

CHARLES A. LENGNICK.

Death of a Good Man and Citizen.

The death of this estimable gentleman

occurred in Greenville during the night of

the 27. He had been in feeble health for

some time, had spent a while in Camden,

and had lately gone to Greenville in the

hope of renewing his better physical con-

dition, and was the guest of his sister-

in-law, Mrs. John H. Houston. Mr.

Lengnick was born in Dresden, Saxony,

in 1834, and came to this country in

young manhood, and married Miss Mary

Burdell, of Charleston. Besides his

widow, he left three sons, Messrs. J. M.

Lengnick, E. E. Lengnick and Albert

Lengnick. The two former resides in

Beaufort, and the latter in St. Louis.

His two daughters are Mrs. John Wilson,

of Waynesville, N. C., and Mrs. J. S. Bur-

dell, of Camden, S. C. He also left several

grandchildren.

Mr. Lengnick came to Charleston when

quite a young man, and engaged in busi-

ness. When the Civil War began, he was

among those other brave spirits who volun-

teered to defend their adopted home from

the invader. He volunteered with the

German Artillery, and is reported to have

been a good soldier. At the close of the

war, with his brother, he engaged in the

wholesale notion business on Hayne street,

Charleston, but the financial crash that

visited the country a few years latter

crushed him along with many other busi-

ness houses all over the land.

In all the walks of life Mr. Lengnick

was a man most gentle in manner and con-

duct, and was esteemed by all who had the

pleasure of his acquaintance. He was a

devoted husband, a fond father, and a

good, true friend, and the news of his

death, while not entirely unexpected,

brought sadness and sorrow to many

friends, who feel the deepest and warmest

sympathy for the afflicted wife and be-

reaved children, who mourn the loss here

of a husband and father whose memory is

of a husband and father whose memory is

worthy of all honor. As for ourselves, we

shall sorely miss our good old friend, who

we have known for many years.

The remains, accompanied by Mrs. Leng-

nick and Mr. J. M. Lengnick, who were

with him at his demise, and Mrs. Wilson

and Mrs. Burdell, reached Beaufort Fri-

day evening at twilight and were taken to

St. Helena Church, the church deceased

attended in life when, in the presence of a

large gathering of friends, the solemn and

impressive services of the Episcopal

Church were read by the rector, Rev W. L.

Githens. The pallbearers were Messrs. C. E.

Danner, R. R. Legare, B. S. Sams, W. H.

McFeeley, D. W. Crocker, W. R. Bris-

tol and C. C. Townsend. The mortal re-

mains were laid to rest in the cemetery at-

tached to the church; the grave being

buried beneath beautiful floral tributes

contributed by sorrowing friends.

Linked By Lengnicks: Lewis Wood Lengnick

March 11, 2015

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Lengnick, Lewis Wood    (card 1/1)

BG   April 27, 1981     p. 12

Best copy available.

*****

LEWIS LENGNICK

Lewis Wood Lengnick, 74

died Friday at LaJolla, Calif.

Mr. Lengnick was born Jan.

15, 1907 in Aiken, a son of the

late Emil E. and Lena Wood

Lengnick. He was retired

president of Hawaiian

Electric Co. in Honolulu.

Surviving are his wife, Polly

Barr Lengnick of Austin,

Texas; and a brother, C.

Alfred Lengnick of Beaufort.

 

Linked By Lengnicks: Emilie Guerard Lengnick

March 11, 2015

 

 

 

Scan0007 (2)

 

Lengnick, Emilie                (card 1/1)

BG          March 3, 1966    p. 2

EMILIE LENGNICK

Funeral services for Miss

Emilie Guerard Lengnick of

1411 Bay St., were Wednesday

at 3 p.m. at St. Helena Pro-

testant Episcopal Church with

the Rev. John W. Hardy office-

ating. Burial was in the church

cemetery directed by Morrall

Funeral Home.

Miss Lengnick died Monday

at Charleston.

She was a graduate of the

University of South Carolina

and was a member of Alpha

Delta Pi Sorority. She was a

member of St. Helena Church.

Surviving are: her parents,

Mr. and Mrs. C. Alfred Leng-

nick of Beaufort; two sister,

Mrs. Colden R. Battey Jr., of

Beaufort and Mrs. Coming Ball

Gibbs Jr., of Charleston.

*****
Clever reader and commenter Linda Smith grew up and around Beaufort. On this previous post about Georgia On My Mind, she said that she knew Emily Lengnick and believed that Emily’s father’s name was Alfred.

Good job, Linda! This obituary confirms what you remembered back in 1964.

Linked By Lengnicks: John Marion Lengnick

March 7, 2015

Scan0007 (3)

 

Scan0007 (4)

Lengnick, John Marion   (card 1/2)

BG          August 27, 1915                p. 1

Mr. John Marion Lengnick died

early Monday morning at Battle Creek

Sanitarium, Battle Creek, Mich.,

where he had gone several months

ago for his health, after an illness

extending over a period of years. The

news of his death was received here

that morning with many expressions

of sadness and regret, for he was uni-

versally beloved and respected here,

his hometown for almost his entire

life. While it as known for some

time that he was not receiving the

benefit he hoped to derive from his

trip there, it was hoped that he

would rally from this attack.

While Mr. Lengnick had lived in

Beaufort for many years, his native

home was Charleston, he having been

born there nearly forty-nine years

ago. He was the eldest son of the late

Mr. Charles A. Lengnick and Mrs.

Lengnick of that city, and is survived

by an unusually large number of rel-

atives, among whom are his wife,

and two children, his mother, Mrs.

Mary Lengnick, two sisters, Mrs.

James Burdell of Camden, S. C., and

Mrs. J. C. H. Wilson of Rock Hill

and two brothers, Messrs. Charles A.

Lengnick of St. Louis, Mo., and E.

E. Lengnick of this city.

The death of Mr. Lengnick re-

moves from Beaufort one of its most

representative citizens, one, who un-

til a few years ago when his health

failed, was a most active worker for

the welfare of the town and also an

ardent worker among church and

business circles.

He was a prominent

Knights of Pythias and a member of

the Masonic Lodge, and for many

years a vestryman of Saint Helena

Episcopal Church, which office he

held at the time of his death. Mr.

Lengnick was also a director of the

Beaufort Bank, which closed its doors

at two o’clock on Wednesday after-

noon as a tribute of respect, and a

member of the firm of Lengnick

Brothers which has for many years

conducted the well known dry goods

store on Bay Street. During the

years 1909, 1910, 1911 and 1912 he

served in the State Legislature as a

Representative from this county hav-

ing been elected for two terms.

The funeral services were held on

Wednesday afternoon in the presence

of a large number of relatives and

friends in the Saint Helena Episcopal

Church at six thirty o’clock with the

Rev. C. W. Boyd, rector of the

Church, officiating. The interment was

made in the family lot of the grave-

yard of the church just as the shadows

of evening began to fall. The follow-

ing acted as pallbearers: active,

Messrs. C. G. Richardson, C. G.

Luther, George Waterhouse, W. J.

Thomas, D. W. Crocker, and W. H.

Cory; honorary, Messrs. W. R. Bris-

tol, H. M. Stuart, J. S. Claghorn,

and W. F. Marscher. Seldom have

more beautiful floral tributes been

seen at any funeral in Beaufort and

they attested in a measure to the high

esteem with which Mr. Lengnick was

held.

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*****

I noticed *Finally* after reading and transcribing and proofreading this obit that there’s an error. I wondered why John Marion Lengnick’s brother Albert Carl wasn’t listed in the obit, and who’s Charles A. Lengnick in St. Louis, Missouri?

Of course, the Charles A. in the obit is Albert Carl Lengnick who married Georgia Agnes Bateson.

I’m a sloooow learner.

Linked By Lengnicks: Emil Edward Lengnick, Sr.

March 5, 2015

Scan0006

Scan0006 (2)

Lengnick, Emil Edward (card 1/2)

BG          November 12, 1942         p. 1

BEAUFORT LOSES

GOOD CITIZEN

*****

E. E. Lengnick Buried

Wednesday

Emil Edward Lengnick, sixty-

six, died at his home here at 6

o’clock Tuesday morning after a

brief illness. Funeral services

were conducted at St. Helena’s

Episcopal church Wednesday af-

ternoon at 4:30 o’clock, the Rev.

R. Maynard Marshall officiating.

Burial followed in the church-

yard.

Surviving are his widow, Mrs.

Lena Wood Lengnick; two sons,

C. Alfred Lengnick, of Beaufort,

and Lewis W. Lengnick, of Hono-

lulu; one grandchild, Paula Wood

Lengnick of Beaufort; a third

son, E. E. Lengnick, Jr., died in

1925.

Mr. Lengnick was born in

Charleston November 24, 1876,

the son of Charles Alfred and

Mrs. M. M. Lengnick, but moved

to Beaufort at the age of six. For

many years he was associated

with his brother, Marion Leng-

nick, in the mercantile business

under the firm name Lengnick

Brothers but retired some years

ago.

During the first World War

he was chairman of the Beaufort

county chapter of the American

Red Cross and at the time of his

death was chairman of the Beau-

fort County rationing board. He

had been trustee and treasurer

of the Beaufort Township lib-

rary since its organization in

1917 and for many years had

been first junior and then senior

warden of St. Helena’s Episcopal

church.

Active pallbearers, J. F. Mars-

cher, A. A. Marscher, Hardee

McLeod, E. B. Rodgers, J. E. Mc-

Teer, G. W. Kinghorn.

A large number of relatives

and friends attended the service.

The floral offering was beautiful.

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