Archive for January 13th, 2020

Andrew Marshall, a Free Man of Color in Savannah

January 13, 2020

Georgia

Chatham County

In the name of God, Amen: I Andrew Marshall a free man of color of the City of Savannah, being of sound and disposing mind and memory, do make and publish this my last Will and Testament.

Item First. I commit my soul unto God, hoping for happiness in the world to come, and desire that my body be buried in my family vault in the graveyard in Savannah.

Item Second. I give devise and bequeath to my wife Sarah Marshall, the Southern half of lot number nineteen (19) Farm and Bryant Streets in the City of Savannah, with the improvements thereon; also my household and kitchen furniture, my four wheeled carriage and one horse to have and to hold the same for and during the term of her natural life, and after her death, to be equally divided between my sons Joseph and George , their heirs executors & administrators forever. (Grand children to represent their parents and take per Stirpes and not per Capita) and after the death of either of them without child or children, or representatives of children, then to the survivor his heirs, executors Administrators and assigns forever.

Item Third: I give devise and bequeath unto my son George Marshall the Northern Half of said lot number nineteen (19) containing a double stone building on Farm Street and a wooden building back of it in the lane, with all the improvements thereon to have and to hold the same to him his heirs executors Administrators and assigns forever. But should my said son George depart this life without leaving a child or children or representatives of children living at the time of his death, then immediately after his death to my wife Sarah Marshall, and to my son Joseph, so long as they both shall live, and after the death of my said wife Sarah, to my son, Joseph, his heirs executors Administrators and assigns forever —

Item Fourth – I give devise and bequeath to Georgiana the daughter of Cripy Houston Four shares of stock in the Marine and Fire Insurance Bank of the State of Georgia

Item Fifth – I give devise and bequeath unto my son Joseph Marshall Lot number Eleven (11) in that part of the City of Savannah, known as the village of St Gall with the improvements thereon, to have and to hold the same to him his heirs, executors Administrators and assigns forever.

Item Sixth. I give devise and bequeath  my silver watch, with all my wearing apparel unto my cousin Andrew, a slave now owned by Dr. Kollock.

Item Seventh. All the rest and residue of my property, not herein specifically bequeathed (and out of which I desire that all my debts may be paid) after the payment of my debts, I give devise and bequeath unto my wife Sarah, and to my sons Joseph and George to be equally divided between them their Heirs Executors Administrators and assigns forever, But should either of them die, without leaving a child or children or representatives of children, living at the time of their death then to the survivors or survivor of them, their and his heirs executors Administrators and assigns forever.

Item Eighth. I nominate constitute and appoint Frederick A. Tupper, John W. Anderson and Wylly Woodbrige Esqrs, Executors of this my last Will and Testament

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this Thirtieth day of July in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and fifty two.

Andrew Marshall  L S

Joseph Felt and Wylly Woodbridge vouched that they were each witnesses to the signature of Andrew Marshall on the will on April 6, 1857.

His residence was at Perry and Whitaker Streets. He died of consumption.

 

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Buried in Laurel Grove South

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From New York

From GenealogyBank, Augusta Chronicle, December 17, 1856:

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A Black Man’s Funeral.

We announced some days ago the death, at Richmond, Virginia, of Andrew Marshall, the colored preacher, who had been ministering in holy things to the slave population of Savannah for nearly forth years. His remains, encased in a neat metalic coffin, were brought from Richmond, at the expense of his congregation, and yesterday was set apart at the First African Baptist Church for the funeral ceremonies of the lamented dead. Long before the hour appointed for the services, an immense throng without respect to color or condition, collected at the Church, the floor, aisles, galleries, and even steps and windows of which were densely packed. Hundreds, unable to gain admittance, were assembled in front and around the Church, while the street was completely blocked up with vehicles of every description.

At the appointed hour the body was taken from the residence of the deceased to the Church, and placed in front of the altar. After prayer, singing, and the reading of appropriate lessons from the scriptures, an eloquent and impressive discourse was preached by the Rev. Mr. Rambaut, formerly of the First Baptist Church, now on a visit to the city.

The services in the church having been concluded the body was returned to the hearse and the immense congregation formed in procession, the deacons and other officers of the various churches in front; next came the remains of the deceased, followed by the Colored Benevolent and Temperance Societies, and after them a long line of carriages, some fifty in number, and a multitude of pedestrians. The procession was a most solemn and imposing spectacle, and attracted much attention as it passed through the city. It moved up West Broad street and thence to Laurel Grove Cemetery, where the body was deposited in the family vault, with the usual ceremonies of the Baptist Church.

Andrew Marshall was, in many respects, a remarkable man. We are but little informed as to his early history, but learn that he was originally a slave, and having accumulated a considerable amount of money — his earnings in his own time, as the more industrious of our slaves seldom fail to do, purchased his freedom. His secular pursuit was that of a drayman, which he followed with energy and thrift, and laid up a comfortable support for himself and family, in his old age. His chief employment, however, for nearly a half century, was the Christian ministry, in which he acquired a large fund of scriptural lore, and exercised almost unbounded influence among his race by the truth and power of his sermons, and the piety of his life. He was, as before stated, the Pastor of the First African Baptist Church in this city, and though over a century in age, he continued his labors among his flock with unabated zeal up to the day of his death. He was greatly respected by all our citizens, and an idol among the large congregation of his own color so long under his pastoral care — a fact which no one can double who witnessed the deep solemnity and unfeigned grief that characterized the obsequies of yesterday. — Savannah Republican.

 

Good night, Marshall family. We’re thinking of you.