Archive for January 12th, 2020

Dog Saves Infant, 1821

January 12, 2020

When I’m looking through the old files and newspaper articles, I get easily distracted. EASILY. The stories are so good.

Like this one…

Augusta_Chronicle_1821-05-17 DogSavesInfant

From the Augusta Chronicle, May 17, 1821, from GenealogyBank.

Remarkable preservation.–Mr. Geo. Kreps and family, of this town, emigrated last fall to Alabama. In crossing a river,  in the Indian nation, they mistook the ford, and the wagon and horses, with the contents, were suddenly immersed in the stream. In the agitation of the moment, Mrs. Kreps parted from her infant child, which was carried rapidly down the current. At that instant, a large dog, which had joined the family a few days before, sprung after the babe, overtook it just as it was sinking, and conveyed it safely to the shore. The horses also regained a footing, and the whole party was saved. The manner in which the dog had joined them was truly providential. They were resting by the road side, when he, “a perfect stranger” came up and fawned upon them; they returned his caresses, and he continued with them, their future benefactor.–Winchester Republican.

*****
We do not deserve dogs.

The Catalogue of Chatham Academy, 1832-1833

January 12, 2020

While looking for more Densler information on ancestry.com, I found this little jewel in its entirety.

The 3 Densler children of Frederick and Mary are mentioned and BONUS! William Starr Basinger, written as “Bassinger” which it often is, and gives us a clue as to the correction pronunciation.

CATALOGUE

OF THE

TRUSTEES, INSTRUCTERS AND STUDENTS

OF

CHATHAM ACADEMY,

SAVANNAH, GEO.

FROM NOVEMBER 5TH, 1832, TO MAY 5TH, 1833.

**SAVANNAH:

W. T. WILLIAMS,

1833

BOARD OF TRUSTEES.

REV. EDWARD NEUFVILLE, PRESIDENT.

GEORGE GLEN, ESQ. SECRETARY.

WM. THORNE WILLIAMS, ESQ. TREASURER.

RICHARD W. HABERSHAM, ESQ.

DR. wILLIAM C. DANIELL.

BENJAMIN E. STILES, ESQ.

ANTHONY BARCLAY, ESQ.

RICHARD R. CUYLER, ESQ.

HON. WILLIAM LAW.

 

Louisa F. Alexander and Sarah R. Alexander, from Wilkes Co., Washington, Georgia. Louisa married Jeremy Gilmer and Sarah married Alexander Robert Lawton.

William S. Bas(s)inger from Savannah. He would have been about 5 years old.

Sisters Mary W. Densler and Rebecca A. Densler from Savannah, both of whom are mentioned in their mother’s will of 1852. Their brother Edwin W. Densler is noted here, but isn’t mentioned in the will because he died in 1843. There was another young son named William S. Densler who was born and died in 1815. I found him by chance while looking for another William Densler.

RECAPITULATION.

Whole number of Females, 153

Whole number of Males, 84

Total, 237

REMARKS.

It is the intention of the Principals of this Institution, to afford every facility to young ladies and gentlemen for acquiring a thorough and practical education.

The Principals will devote their whole time to the benefit of their pupils, assisted, in the departments of instruction, by competent helps. It is the object of the Trustees to afford every facility, for the successful prosecution of study, and the attainment, in the Female Department, of a good female education; in the Male Department, to prepare young gentlemen for college, or give them as good an education as can be furnished by the best high schools.

The location of the Academy is airy, commanding a delightful prospect. Its apartments are spacious and pleasant, fitted up with convenience and elegance. Maps, Globes, and Chemical and Philosophical Apparatus, will soon be provided.

The pupils are so classes, as to provide for their receiving instruction from several teachers, by way of explanations and illustrations. No pains will be spared to make them understand the studies to which they attend, and to induce in them the habit of thinking for themselves. A course of Chemical lectures will be delivered during the next fall and winter terms, by one of the teachers. It is very desirable that those, who enter the school, be present at the commencement of the term.

This city, in the healthfulness of its situation, in the moral and religious character of its citizens, and its easy communication with almost every part of the State, particularly of the low country, holds out many inducements to parents, who wish to send their sons and daughters abroad for instruction.

Tuition in the Primary Department, per term of 12 weeks — $6 00

Do. in the Junior do. — 8 00

Do. in the Senior do. — 10 00

Do. for the Classics, — 12 50

Do. in addition to any of the above English Studies, for the Classics, Mathematics, &c. — 2 50

Do. in the French Department, — 8 00

I haven’t found much information online as to when the Chatham Academy began. I’ll poke around some more and if/when I find out more, I’ll add that here.