Batesons United by Death: A Detour Through Laurel Grove

Sugar and I are in Laurel Grove Cemetery with his Bateson cousins from Canada.

We have visited the Bateson plot where Christopher Remington Bateson and his family are buried. This plot was unmarked since the earliest burial in 1853.

Which brings me to another point: The marker is a tad wrong. Sugar worried over what to say on the inscription for several weeks (months?) before finalizing. He asked me the dates of death, like I know something, and I popped off Christopher Remington Bateson’s date of death as 1855 and his grandson Thomas Bateson’s death as 1879. Which is all completely correct, but I forgot about the girls, Alice, age 8 3/4, and Mary Jane, age 12 hours, who both died in 1853. I know, I know, but I was suffering from that malady I have. The one where I can’t focus on what’s right in front of me. I can stare at it, like when you are looking for a book on a shelf, or a particular piece of paper in a stack, and I can’t find it. It’s just not there. But I’ll offer you something else to make up for my malady, like a pretty leaf. Or perhaps some chocolate, because it makes perfect sense to satisfy a completely different sense. Because chocolate.

Now, since Sugar and I received Walter’s comment on the blog about the names of Thomas and Martha Mann Bateson’s children, we know we’re looking for Alice (different Alice than above), Georgia Agnes (who I found out from a blog commenter that mother Martha had a sister named Georgia, and their mother was named Agnes), and Thomas Remington Bateson.

We had already found a good bit about Alice, and thanks to Walter, we found out *A LOT* about Georgia Agnes, because before he commented, we didn’t know her middle name. That’s right, folks, we should have been able to figure that out, but the name didn’t follow the traditional naming conventions.

Before the Canadian Batesons come to Savannah, we did a little more research on our own at the Georgia Historical Society, and we found the death announcement for little Thomas Remington Bateson.

BatesonThomasRemington

As usual, an answer leads to more questions. In this case, who are William Spears and William Ebbes?

I had seen William Spears’s name as a guardian for a Bateson child, or perhaps children (because the record is not clear or I just can’t see what it’s saying even though it’s right in front of me), on a record for Thomas Bateson.

BatesonThomas1880 ChildrenOf

I really don’t know exactly the connection, but here’s a stab at it. Thomas the father and his brother Christopher Henry were in the Civil War in a Georgia unit. Perhaps they had a military association even though I can’t prove that.

I’ve copied and pasted from the http://www.nps.gov website.

Thomas Bateson was a member of the following unit…

1st Regiment, Georgia Infantry (Olmstead’s)

OVERVIEW:1st (Mercer’s-Olmstead’s) Volunteers Infantry Regiment was organized prior to the war with militia companies from Savannah. Other members were from Quitman, and the counties of De Kalb, Oglethorpe, Washington, and Tattnall. After entering Confederate service it wsa disciplined at both heavy artillery and infantry. The regiment served on the coast with a detachment at Savannah and another at Charleston until May, 1864. It then was assigned to General Mercer’s Brigade and during the Atlanta Campaign, July 20 to September 1, reported 11 killed, 31 wounded, and 6 missing. Transferred to J.A. Smith’s command it continued the fight with Hood in Tennessee and on December 21, 1864, had only 52 men present for duty. Later it saw action at Bentonville and surrendered on April 26, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Hugh W. Mercer and Charles H. Olmstead, and Lieutenant Colonels Martin J. Ford and William S. Rockwell.
His service record:

Bateson , Thomas

SIDE:Confederacy
COMPANY:
SOLDIER’S RANK IN:Private
SOLDIER’S RANK OUT:Private
ALTERNATE NAME:
FILM NUMBER:M226 ROLL 4
PLAQUE NUMBER:
NOTES:General Note – See also 63 Ga. Inf.
He was also in another unit with his brother Christopher Henry Bateson.

63rd Regiment, Georgia Infantry

OVERVIEW: 63rd Infantry Regiment was organized at Savannah, Georgia, in December, 1862, using the 13th Georgia Infantry Battalion as its nucleus. With more than 1,100 officers and men, the unit was assigned to the Departments of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. It served as infantry and heavy artillery at Thunderbolt and Rosedew Island, and Companies B and K were engaged at Battery Wagner near Charleston. Later the regiment was placed in General Mercer’s and J.A. Smith’s Brigade, Army of Tennessee. Now serving as infantry, it participated in the Atlanta Campaign, July 20 to September 1, this unit reported 10 killed, 61 wounded, and 39 missing and in December, 1864, totalled 143 effectives. Very few surrendered on April 26, 1865. The field officers were Colonel George A. Gordon, Lieutenant Colonel George R. Black, and Majors Joseph V.H. Allen and John R. Giles.
Thomas’s service record:

Bateson , Thomas

SIDE:Confederacy
COMPANY:K,D
SOLDIER’S RANK IN:Private
SOLDIER’S RANK OUT:Private
ALTERNATE NAME:
FILM NUMBER:M226 ROLL 4
PLAQUE NUMBER:
NOTES:General Note – See also 1 (Olmstead’s) Ga. Inf.
Christopher’s service record:

Bateson , Christopher H.

SIDE:Confederacy
COMPANY:K,D
SOLDIER’S RANK IN:Private
SOLDIER’S RANK OUT:Private
ALTERNATE NAME:
FILM NUMBER:M226 ROLL 4
PLAQUE NUMBER:
NOTES:none
I find William Spears in the Savannah City Directories. In the earliest one that I can find, it’s 1874, he’s listed as a gardener, and he lives near the tollgate. Sugar doesn’t know where the tollgate was. Another question. He thinks it was probably on the east end of the city.
SpearsWilliam1874 Gardener
 Then I find William Spears in association with William Ebbs. They are hucksters in Stall 33. William Spears’s residence is in Thunderbolt, which is east of Savannah. Some of the listings say “Thunderbolt Road”, which could possibly mean simply the road “to” Thunderbolt, not “in” Thunderbolt.
Ebbs&Spears CityDirectory 1879 Spears&Ebbs CityDirectory 1879 Spears&Ebbs CityDirectory 1880
 We did a little homework before Walter and Audrey came to town. While we couldn’t find out what happened to William Spears, I located William Ebbs at Laurel Grove Cemetery. He’s in Lot 1494.
*****
Now that we’ve paid our respects to the Christopher Remington Bateson family, we head over to visit with William Ebbs in Lot 1494.
IMG_7739
Uh-oh. Here we go again.
IMG_7740
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