The Gold Mine in the Closet: Gordonston, Revisited at 11 Edgewood

According to the Savannah City Directory, the Edward Percival Lawton family was living at 11 Edgewood in Gordonston prior to 1930.

I took the Lawton house photo from the Gordonston sales brochure, which can be seen in the previous post, and rotated and cropped the photo.

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So we’re looking for a Dutch Colonial, if my design history serves me well.  Y’all feel free to call me out if I’m wrong.

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The house is on a corner, so we were able to make the turn and look into their backyard.  ‘Cause we have no shame.

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We turned around, which took some doing, because y’all know that I am from the South and it is bad manners to turn around in someone’s driveway, which meant an all-out three-point-turn in the middle of the street, and cruised back by.

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This door in the photo above is the front door.  It seems an odd arrangement, but perhaps it led to a foyer? mud room?  Air lock?

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Sugar’s mother Genette is on the bicycle on the left. I don’t know who is on the right. Perhaps Garnett Basinger, who would be Genette’s Uncle Walter’s daughter.

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Unknown woman, but clearly someone important in their lives, which is why people took photos in those days.

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Sugar’s grandmother is on the left. I can’t identify anyone else, so I’ll leave that up to you people out on the internet.

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Perhaps the child on the left is Matilda Basinger. And we don’t know who the baby is. Mary “Leslie” Basinger Lawton sits on the front steps of the house with her youngest daughter Genette to her left.

For some reason, in the box of photos are identical photos of Mary “Leslie” Basinger Lawton and one of her sons-in-law, Howard Read, who married her daughter Leslie.


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Here’s Leslie and Howard’s daughter, Margaret Louisa Read.

Don’t forget the interior shot again.  This room looks so pleasant and cool.  Of course, there was no television, and I’m wondering about a radio.  No air conditioning, no central heat, no storm windows.

Mary "Leslie" Basinger Lawton, her daughter Mary Genevieve "Genette" Lawton, her grandson Billy Garrard, her daughter Margaret Lawton Garrard, and her granddaughter Mary Garrard.

Mary “Leslie” Basinger Lawton, her daughter Mary Genevieve “Genette” Lawton, her grandson Billy Garrard, her daughter Margaret Lawton Garrard, and on the floor, her granddaughter Mary Garrard.

And that’s 11 Edgewood.  The numbers have changed, but the basic facade remains the same.  It looks like an addition was added to the rear, from the photos we took a few days ago.

 

From the 1928 Savannah City Directory, we find that Edward and Leslie Lawton were living at 11 Edgewood in Gordonston.  Their daughter Genette is listed as Jeanetta.  Yet the following year, when Edward dies in Paris, their address is listed at 219 East Gaston Street.  There is no 1929 City Directory in existence, unless Sugar has one in his closet.

From the 1928 Savannah City Directory, we find that Edward and Leslie Lawton were living at 11 Edgewood in Gordonston. Their daughter Genette is listed as Jeanetta. Yet the following year, when Edward dies in Paris, their address is listed at 219 East Gaston Street on the death certificate. There is no 1929 City Directory in existence, unless Sugar has one in his closet.

Oh, to step back in time.  This is a close second.

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2 Responses to “The Gold Mine in the Closet: Gordonston, Revisited at 11 Edgewood”

  1. Sharon Says:

    The front door makes good sense for that time period. Generally, it would have led to the kitchen area with the formal rooms to the side. This would mean heat and smells from cooking would be isolated from the sitting areas and if placed correctly, front and back door could be opened for air flow with out affecting the sitting areas. A lovely house. Address change upon death-the Great Depression?

    Like

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