Because I Can’t Stop Thinking About Agnes Mann

(This is the ninth part of a series.  If you would like to start at the first part, click here.)

I’ve got Agnes Mann on my mind.

If she was a hotel keeper in 1880, perhaps I can find which hotel.  Perhaps I can’t.  Regardless, I’m curious to know more.

I found the Beaufort County Library has a collection called the Beaufort District Collection.  When I went online, I found they had an obituary index online.  Here’s the link: CLICK HERE.

I found Agnes, and some of her children.  So it seemed reasonable to send the nice librarians an email to inquire of such a thing.

The website said that the librarians can take your request, copy the desired obituary, and mail it  you, all for the low, low price of $5.00.  However, the email I received in return from the nice librarian said that they recognized my email address as a local one, and if I wanted to pop in, I could copy it myself for ten cents.

I just happened to have ten cents burning a hole in my pocket.

Sugar was at work, and I called him to warn him that I might need to go to Beaufort.  He said great, we can go next Tuesday.  I said maybe no, I might not get next Tuesday off, and I need to go now.  Without him.

*****

It was so simple.  Someone has created an obituary card file using 3×5 index cards and the actual obituary.  I found Agnes, and some of her children, and her grandchildren.

MannAgnes 001

 

 

MRS. AGNES MANN.
Death of a Good Woman and De-
voted Mother.
After a long period of suffering, Mrs.
Agnes Mann, relict of the late Daniel
Mann, and a very old resident of Beaufort,
departed this life Saturday, at the resi-
dence of her daughter, Mrs. L. C. Scheper,
in the 78th year of her age. Mrs. Mann
was the fond mother of a large family, and
had much sorrow in her journey of life,
having seen pass from her nine children,
the most of whom had reached manhood
and womanhood. She bore her cross with
Christian fortitude, and was an example to
all who knew her. She left surviving her
two daughters, Mrs. L. C. Scheper and
Miss Emily Mann, and one son, Mr. Daniel
Mann, besides many grand and greatgrand
children. The funeral services were held in
St. Helena Church, Sunday evening in the
presence of many friends. Rev. J. B. Camp-
bell, of the Carteret Street Church, con-
ducting the ceremonies. The remains were
laid to rest in the family lot in the
same church yard. The floral offerings
were very beautiful. The following
gentlemen were pallbearers: W. J. Thomas,
R. R. Legare, H. M. Stuart, Jr., J. M.
Lengnick, W. R. Bristol and W. F. Mar-
scher.

(Obituary comes from the Palmetto Post, July 19, 1906.)

Now this was confusing to me.  If Agnes Mann was “laid to rest in the family lot”, where was she?  We didn’t see her marker, and I know that her husband Daniel Mann had a marker, although we didn’t actual find him.  Don’t tell me that this is another plot with no markers.

I told the librarian that we looked for Agnes’s house, which, according to the 1900 census, should be at 117 Craven Street, but the numbers were off. She suggested that we look at the Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, and gave me the web address.

*****

When I got home, I used the web address that she gave me, but you can use this handy link to look at all your choices:  http://library.sc.edu/digital/collections/sanborn.html.

If you want to jump right into the action, go HERE, which should be Beaufort, South Carolina, in 1899, for sheet 4.  Zoom way in, perhaps 4 left-clicks, and you’ll see at the bottom of the page,  Craven Street, with the  building numbers next to them.  If you can find the Tabernacle Baptist Church, look at the building to the right, 117 Craven Street.  That’s where Agnes lived the following year in 1900.

Below is a download of the Sanborn Fire Insurance Map for 1905 for the same neighborhood.  If you enlarge this map, it fragments too much to be legible, but you get the idea of what you are looking for.

BeaufortSC SanbornMap1905 Sheet_4 - 117 CravenStreet

 

And if you go to a google map, you’ll find that the house is still standing.

You know what this means, don’t you?

We have to go back to Beaufort.

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