Easter Lilies For Bonaventure & Laurel Grove, 2013

See how far behind I am?  I’m just now writing about Easter, and it was early this year.  It can’t be helped.  I was trying to blog about things in a chronological, sensible-type order, but dead people keep gumming up the works.  Transcribing old letters has made me get my head examined, or, more correctly, my eyes, which are, technically, in my head.  I am now the proud owner of trifocals, which are respectfully referred to as “transitional” lenses.  Call them what you want, we all know that they are trifocals.  And I love them.  Except for the part that I can now see all the dog hair.

*****

Oh, yes, back to Easter.

Sugar said that his mother always went to the cemetery on Christmas and Easter, and she took flowers for the graves.  So sometimes we miss the flower-taking on the holidays, but we *wanted* to do it.  We had *good* intentions.  We were *going to do it*, but it just didn’t happen.

We talked about it again, but could we make it happen?  Or would we buy the flowers, and not go, and the flowers fade away on the top of Sugar’s refrigerator?

I was in Home Depot, or perhaps Lowes.  I can’t remember, and I didn’t have my new glasses yet, so it’s not like I could see where I was.  Yet I drive.  And yet I digress.  You know that funny meme that’s making the rounds on the internet about “Dance Like No One Is Watching”?  Yeah, they don’t want you doing that in the Home Depot and Lowes.

I spot a display of Easter lilies, and I call Sugar, and shout something about “LILIES”, like that would improve the poor cell phone connection of me being in a big metal box of building, and I shouted “CHEAP”.  I can only hope that the other customers did not think that I was soliciting business by shouting that I was cheap.  “Lily’s cheap!”

Anyway, I bought four small pots of cheap Easter lilies.  If we didn’t go, then we could just stick them in the ground and hope for the best, which is pretty much my premise on gardening.  I do the sticking-in-the-ground part, and it’s up to the plant to do the rest.

Sugar was not very happy when he saw just how cheap the lilies were.

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My reasoning for buying cheap Easter lilies is that no one is going to take care of them once we place them at the cemetery, so it’s really that we are showing a token of affection for the dead.  We’re not setting out to impress anyone, right?  Right?

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The first stop was Laurel Grove, and I was actually more interested in seeing how the crape myrtles were doing.

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Those little darlings were doing just fine.  The doggone things were going to live, and grow, and bloom, after all.

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The oleander came back, too.

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I was sitting on the headstone of Emily Augusta Lawton to get a good angle on the grave of William and Alice Garrard, and right about here, I got a little weepy.  I am so far from home, even though this is home now, and the day was just so perfect and crisp, and I couldn’t help but tear up a bit.  I covered it up pretty well.  Sugar didn’t notice.

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He was busy slinging debris.

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I walked around a bit.  There was no one else in the cemetery.  Everyone else goes to the tourist attraction cemetery at Bonaventure.

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Lawton O. Clanton and his wife Anzie L. Floyd.

Here’s a Lawton, but we don’t know who he is.

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Somebody’s mother has been here a long time for a tree to grow big enough to disrupt her grave markers.

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Somebody’s mother is Georgia Barrington King. You can see the Jones-Lawton mausoleum in the background.

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Oooh, wisteria!  You can almost smell it, can’t you?

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And the first Easter lily has been placed at the Jones-Lawton mausoleum. The crape myrtles are to the right rear of the mausoleum, and they should be really magnificent by July.

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William Garrard and his wife Alice Knott Garrard.

We finished up, and headed on our way out, stopping to see a few more headstones.

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Some of the Confederate dead.

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This man is from Tennessee.  What’s he doing here?  Heck, what am I doing here?

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Now at Bonaventure at the Basinger plot.  The big cross is for William Starr Basinger and his wife Margaret Roane Garnett Basinger.  Perhaps you read some of his Civil War letters that I posted when he was a prisoner of war.

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The azaleas were blooming, and it was a spectacular sight throughout the cemetery.

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Sugar dug out a little indentation for the flowerpot to sit down in. I have no clue what he’s pointing and exclaiming at. Yes, I ended a sentence in a preposition. No, I do not care.

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And the second lily has been placed.

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Turning away from the Basinger plot, we look across the lane to the Starr plot, and Sugar notices that the headstone that has been lying on its face for forever has been moved.  The whole cemetery looks cleaned.

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These pieces were leaning against each other, so we repositioned them to see if we could read them.

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I took dirt and rubbed it into the indentions.

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That method doesn’t work as well on a dark stone, so perhaps light-colored sand on a dark stone is the answer.  We don’t have any sand.

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We look at this worn headstone from this angle.

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Then this angle.

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We suddenly realize that this is Peter Basinger, who was a hatter and died of delerium tremens.  Was he as “Mad as a Hatter” and it killed him?  Perhaps.

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The third lily has been placed for Jane Starr Basinger.

Jane Starr Basinger married Peter Basinger’s son, Thomas Elisha Basinger.

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Here’s Edwin Pearson Starr, who wrote letters from the hospital in Virginia to his aunt, Jane Starr Basinger.  He rests beside her.

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Here’s the back of Edwin Pearson Starr’s grave.

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This flat stone is for Ann Starr. She married William Starr. There is another monument in this plot for them at the front right corner as you face the plot.

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Charles Henry Starr is a child of Ann and William Starr.

Charles H. Starr is our Edwin Pearson “Eddie” Starr’s father.  Charles had a brother also named Edwin Pearson Starr who is buried in Charleston, SC.

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All the folks in the Starr plot were once buried in Laurel Grove.

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A final look at the Basinger plot.

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Henry R. Jackson.

I wrote about him in this post.  He was a law partner with Alexander Robert Lawton and William Starr Basinger.  The dissolution of their law firm is mentioned in Sarah Alexander Lawton’s diary, which I will write about in a future post.

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And there’s Corinne Elliott Lawton.

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We brought a lily for her, too, and we placed the lily next to her.

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One of the stories about this statue of Jesus is that he is staring at Corinne’s back, and won’t let her into heaven.  (Rolling eyes here.)  Yes, of course, a totally Christ-like thing to do.  (Can y’all tell I’ve had it with the stories about these people?)

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The line of sight appears to be through the threshold to the plot and to a mausoleum beyond.

I stood in front of the Jesus statue, and looked in the direction that he would be looking in if his eyes worked.  Good grief, people, he’s not looking at Corinne.  At all.

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Someone had already given her azalea blossom, which means that they desecrated a cemetery azalea by breaking off a branch.

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This appears to be the end of the imaginary line of sight by the Jesus statue.

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I don’t know much about Star Trek, but I couldn’t resist this one.  They seemed to be no trouble at all.

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Ah, camellias.  So colorful in the cold weather.

We came to the Meldrim folks.  There’s a mention of Meldrim in Sarah Alexander Lawton’s diary, but I hadn’t found the diary when we were at the cemetery, so another odd coincidence that I took photos of this at all.

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It’s getting late.  We’ve delivered the lilies, and I saw other lilies just like ours decorating the cemetery.

Good night, everyone.  Sleep well.

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