A Walk in the Cemetery at Laurel Grove

On June 17, 2012, Sugar and I made a trip to Savannah to visit some of his dead relatives.  (It’s been reported to me that there are some Rawls folks hereabouts, but I’ve never met any of them.)  You can read more about our cemetery escapades here on that day, unless you get creeped out by pictures of the inside of a mausoleum.  Then don’t click the link.  I dare you to not click. the. link.

Ah.  Well then, that’s that.

So after tootling about the mausoleum grounds, and Sugar picking out a spot for his future demise (how’s THAT for a Sunday outing?), we drove a bit further, then got out and walked around to admire another mausoleum.

Claghorn

Sugar said that his mother knew some Claghorns where he grew up nearby.  Isn’t that the way we all do it?  We see a name, or something triggers a memory, and we announce it out loud, kind of like when you were three and you announced your bathroom visits.  Not that we were planning on peeing in the graveyard (“I’ve got to go pee now!”), but rather we announce something with the unabashed statement of a child, a bit of wonderment, a call out to the big universe that we are here and we have something to say, if anyone cares or not.

Sugar points out something about the detail on the doorway while he’s talking, but I’m way too far away to hear what he’s saying. That man always has something to say. He’ll probably tell me again later.

I’m always surprised at the detail in the photos I make. The color and clarity are intensified and better appreciated inside in the air-conditioning.

There’s a Confederate veteran buried here. See the marker?

The backside of the Claghorn mausoleum.

And looking to your right from this vantage point, there are several raised tombs.

Oops. I didn’t do that.

And the detail over the gateway…

Then we walked a bit further, and came to a Confederate plot that was being refurbished.

The outlines of the plot are being reworked.

I walked on over and started to take photos, and Sugar looked alarmed and asked if I was going to take pictures of ALL of the headstones, which was my cue that he probably needed food and/or to get in out of the heat.  So, sorry, Confederates, here’s only a few of you…

Isaac H. Mathews
Sept. 10, 1918
71 years

S. C. Stewart
July 16, 1918
Age 75 years

Then across the way I saw this, and it looked important somehow.

And yet closer…

THIS CARRONADE CANNON THAT ONCE

RESTED HERE SAW SERVICE IN A CON-

FEDERATE BATTERY ON THE OWENS PLAN-

TATION ON THE LITTLE OGEECHEE RIVER

DURING THE SEIGE (sic) OF SAVANNAH IN 1864.

IT WAS HIDDEN IN A DITCH ON THE PLAN-

TATION AND LATER RETRIEVED AND

GIVEN TO THE GEORGIA HUSSARS.  THE

HUSSARS GAVE IT TO THE CONFEDERATE

VETERANS ASSOCIATION AND THEY HAD

IT PLACED ON THIS GRANITE BASE IN

MEMORIUM OF THE CONFEDERATE CASU-

ALTIES BURIED HERE.  IN 1990 THE

UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY,

SAVANNAH CHAPTER NO. 2, WHO OVER-

SEE THE CARE OF THIS BURIAL PLOT, PUT

THE CARRONADE CANNON ON LOAN TO

FORT JACKSON TO BE PUT ON PUBLIC

DISPLAY AND FOR PROPER PRESERVATION,

WITH THE STIPULATION IF PUBLIC VIEW-

ING IS DISCONTINUED IT IS TO BE RE-

TURNED TO LAUREL GROVE CEMETERY

AND PUT IN ITS ORIGINAL PLACE.

*****

And then we really did have to move along and go find some food, because Sugar was “growing faint with hunger”, and if we hadn’t left then, there might have been another dead body in the cemetery.

I suppose it might be a good thing he had already picked out a spot…

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