A LawtonFest Family Reunion, June 10-11, Part 3

Lawton folks. These ladies are reading "Our Family Circle" by Annie Miller, a book long considered as gospel for the Lawton and allied families. Annie Miller compiled this book in the early 1900's. That's right. No computers. I'd imagine that she used those famous index cards for organizing such a huge database. The book is a work of art and a labor of love.

The morning led off with a continental breakfast and a gathering of Lawtons related by blood and marriage.  After introductions, a business meeting, and some discussions, the speaker was introduced.

 
It was none other than Stephen Hoffius, an editor of the book Northern Money, Southern Land, The Lowcountry Plantation Sketches of Chlotilde R. Martin.    He presented an entertaining overview of the book.  One of my favorite quotations about the book is the following: 

“In the 1920s, as poverty and weather ground away at South Carolina’s formerly grand plantations, Sam Stoney of Medway was known to say, ‘Lord, please send us a rich Yankee.’ Chlotilde Martin’s engaging articles provide fascinating insight into an overlooked era of history that largely determined the shape of today’s lowcountry landscape. As a native South Carolinian, I often thank the Lord for the rich Yankees who decided that their adopted land was too beautiful to despoil, and consequently helped launch one of the nation’s most successful conservation movements.”— Dana Beach, executive director, Coastal Conservation League

Afterwards, there was – what else – a book signing and sales of Mr. Hoffius’s latest book, Upheaval in Charleston: Earthquake and Murder on the Eve of Jim Crow.  Sugar had taken his copy of “Northern Money, Southern Land” to be signed, and also bought another two books that he did not have (he’s a collector of sorts). 

More Lawton book collector types

Bookish Sugar waits his turn.

When Sugar finally got his turn in line, he mentioned that his parents met at Colony Gardens in the Beaufort area.  Colony Gardens was mentioned by Hoffius as one of the places that was developed with northern money, and Mr. Hoffius seemed interested to hear more about Sugar’s parents.  Nice touch, Mr. Hoffius, connecting with your peeps.

Then, yay, it was time for lunch, and we all determined to meet after lunch at the Estill Museum, and then to sojourn to the Lawtonville Cemetery. 

Our charming hostess, Mrs. DeLoach. She loves this town so much, she came to work on her day off just for us Lawton-lovers.

“I’m Mrs. DeLoach.  We’re delighted to have you here.”  The Estill Museum is the tiniest little building.  To get to the second floor you have to go outside and up the stairway. 

Here’s some photos of some random Estill stuff that is in the museum.  You can left-click on any photo to enlarge it once, then left-click on it again to enlarge it yet again.

Estill Stuff

In the 1930’s, twenty mule teams and their drivers pose at the Van Peeples farm located at Solomons Crossroads. Photo courtesy of LaClaire Laffitte.

Lots of the photos were in those shiny acrylic frames so you’ll see some weird other-worldly reflections on the photos. 

A copy of the plat of the town of Estill, SC.

A corn grinder.

This photo was taken through the glass case so you get extra-special reflection. You're welcome.

Cotton hook thingies. Looks dangerous to me.

Estill office equipment. I think I learned to type on a typewriter like this.

And if the office equipment weren't excitement enough, here's a photo of a service station in Garnett.

Then we headed up the outside stairway to the second floor.  Thank goodness for air-conditioning because by this time it’s prime-time for scorching Southern heat.

Love me some quilts.

Closer examination of the quilt and its accompanying booklet shows an interesting twist of coincidence and time.  This quilt is over fifty years old, and it is from the St. John’s Methodist Church in Garnett.  That’s the church that Sir Richard of Garnett goes to when it’s open for services on the 2nd and 4th Sunday of the month.  We went to that church one Sunday when he played his guitar and sang for the church service. 

*****

THE ST. JOHN’S UNITED METHODIST CHURCH QUILT

CIRCA 1949

THE ST. JOHN’S UMC QUILT DISPLAYED HERE WAS FOUND IN A SUNDAY SCHOOL ROOM AT ST. JOHN’S BY CECILIA B. MCKENZIE IN JANUARY, 2010.

BASED ON INFORMATION STATED BELOW, IT IS ASSUMED THAT THE ST. JOHN’S QUILT WAS A FUND-RAISING PROJECT FOR ST. JOHN’S.  THE GREAT MAJORITY OF NAMES WERE MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN’S OR HAD CONNECTIONS WITH ST. JOHN’S MEMBERS.  SOME PERSONS LISTED WERE MEMBERS OF OTHER COMMUNITY CHURCHES AND CHURCHES OUT OF OUR COUNTY, FOR EXAMPLE, IN NORTH AUGUSTA, SC.

MARY ELEANOR BOWERS STATED THAT SHE QUILTED AND EMBROIDERED ANOTHER QUILT USING THE SAME PATTERN AS THE ST. JOHN’S QUILT AS A FUND-RAISER FOR A LOCAL ORGANIZATION.  THAT QUILT WAS THEN RAFFLED.  PERSONS PAID A CERTAIN AMOUNT TO HAVE NAMES PLACED ON MARY ELEANOR’S ORGANIZATION’S QUILT.

ST. JOHN’S UNITED METHODIST CHURCH HAS LOANED THE ST. JOHN’S QUILT TO THE ESTILL MUSEUM, APRIL, 2010, UNTIL A TIME WHEN REQUESTED BACK.  WE, THE MEMBERS, AND PETER MICHAEL LACK, PRESENT PASTOR, EXPRESS OUR APPRECDIATION FOR ALLOWING OUR QUILT TO BE DISPLAYED IN THE ESTILL MUSEUM.

THE FOLLOWING PAGES LIST THE NAMES APPEARING ON THE ST. JOHN’S QUILT.  VIEWERS ARE URGED TO PROVIDE ANY INFORMATION RE:  THIS QUILT AND TO ADDRESS ANY CORRECTIONS IN SPELLING OF NAMES OR INFORMATION AS LISTED BELOW TO

DAVID AND CECILIA B. MCKENZIE, MEMBERS

ST. JOHN’S UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

APRIL 22, 2010

*****

And another bizarre twist.  When we moved to SC 10 years ago, we didn’t know anyone.   BabyBoy met some folks in high school, and one friend, Amanda, is the granddaughter of Jean Wiggins Taylor.  We didn’t know any of that connection then, because we lived an hour away.  Ms. Jean’s maiden name is right there on the quilt.  Her mother was Annie Chisholm Wiggins, who lived in the big house across from Sir Richard (I’ve posted photos of that house before), and she knew Miz Florrie, age 98, who still lives in the area. 

The center of the square is Mattye Riley Chisholm and her husband Jesse Chisholm , who was the postmaster back in the day.

As if that wasn’t enough excitement, we still had to tour the cemetery.  I’ve written about the cemetery before in this post.

Last time we were here, the fields around the cemetery were planted in cotton. This time, it's corn.

This group of Lawton folks listen to Mary Eleanor Wiggins Bowers and Lawton O'Cain expound about Lawton history. I'm in the shade, thank you.

Here's Rev. Winborn Asa Lawton. You saw his photograph in the post with the Lawtonville Baptist Church Museum.

Winborn's wife Lucinda.

This is Anna, Winborn and Lucinda's daughter.

This is about the time when I sat down and the fire ants found me.  So that concludes this post for tonight, even though, there’s more Lawton excitement to come.

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5 Responses to “A LawtonFest Family Reunion, June 10-11, Part 3”

  1. Kariann Says:

    I love Mrs DeLoach already and I think you posted the quilt pictures just for me!

    **drool drool**

    🙂

    I love reading your posts.

    Like

  2. Kariann Says:

    Yeah, unpost-y here too. 🙂

    Like

  3. Ashby Lawton Jones Says:

    Love your post about the reunion! I was there too! Posted about it as well on my blog.

    Take care,

    Ashby Lawton Jones

    Like

    • ruthrawls Says:

      Oh, Ashby, I loved your presentation that day! We enjoyed your father’s presentation about Wesley Lawton, the missionary, and we did a little historical stalking on your missionary ancestors. Welcome to my blog!

      Like

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