Easter Lilies for Bonaventure & Laurel Grove, 2014

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After last year’s less-than-breathtaking lilies, we found these, of all places, at the Publix Supermarket.  Sugar decided that we needed five, and we went over the list again in our heads.  One for Laurel Grove, one for the Basinger plot in Bonaventure, one for the Starr plot, one for Dr. F. Bland Tucker in the Corbin plot, and one for Corinne Elliott Lawton.

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We could probably have gotten many more, but we drew the line at five.

On Easter morning, almost a full week later, the lilies were well bloomed-out and glorious.  Sugar had been keeping them sheltered and watered.

 

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Now on to Bonaventure.  It’s windy and cold, and not many tourists are out yet.  We stop at the Corbin plot where Albert Sidney Lawton is buried, and we see that the same two graves that had flowers at Christmas have flowers again.  We wonder who has been here, and we see that the lilies have blown over, in spite of having been placed into a dug-out hole.

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Sugar has forgotten his shovel but he makes do with a digger of sorts.  It’s really not a machete.  Really, not.

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As we’re driving off, he notices yet another Lawton that we don’t know.  (He figures it out when he gets home because he has books and stuff, but we still don’t know why they are buried in this plot.)

 

 

 

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She’s Lillian Lawton Haynsworth, and she’s buried with her husband James Henry in a Steinberg plot.

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Over to the Basinger plot now, to see his great-grandfather, great-grandmother, mother, and brother, along with some other Basinger folks.

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Now across the lane to the William Starr plot which is shared with their friends, the Peter Basinger family.

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There’s a ready-made receptacle for flowers at the foot of William Starr Basinger’s mother’s grave.  She’s Jane Susan Starr Basinger.

 

One lone azalea blossom is protected deep into the bush from all the rain and wind.

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Onwards to the river to see Corinne Elliott Lawton.

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We consider that no one else has brought flowers.  No one.  Yes, it’s been cold, rainy, and windy.  But no one, not even the tour guides that make money off her “suicide” tale have honored her memory with a floral token.

Can I say that these were the best lilies ever, and each pot was only $5.99?  It’s true.  Magnificent buds and blooms graced each plant.  This does not mean that we are cheap, it means that we are astonished.

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Hey, Corinne, we’ve got your back.

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The far side of this plot has another threshold which we have never crossed. It’s for the Cunninghams.  Nora Lawton, Corinne’s sister, married a Cunningham, and it’s their daughter Sarah Alexander Cunningham who helped me solve the mystery of Corinne’s death.  It wasn’t suicide.

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Good-bye everyone.  Sleep well.

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7 Responses to “Easter Lilies for Bonaventure & Laurel Grove, 2014”

  1. Judith Richards Shubert Says:

    What a beautiful post ~ in pictures and in words. It gave me chill bumps. Sugar and you, my dear, are so dedicated. I know the flowers were so welcomed by all…. What gorgeous monuments!!

    • ruthrawls Says:

      It’s that old saying: “Bloom where you are planted.”
      I didn’t post the photo of my scraped shin where I fell over at the embankment. Could have broken a hip, or a head. I’ve had a feeling of foreboding for the last two weeks. This is the 4th thing that’s happened. I thought things came in threes, or at least that’s what my grandma Packett said.

  2. Gregory Lawton Says:

    I came across your blog by accident, and have found it absolutely fascinating. Roaming old cemeteries and wondering about the lives of the people who have gone before us is a good way to spend a little time, and there’s no better place for that han Bonaventure cemetery.

    • ruthrawls Says:

      Hello Gregory, and welcome to the blog! How do you know Bonaventure Cemetery? Just curious.

      • Gregory Lawton Says:

        Well, we lived in Atlanta for a few years. I’ve always had an interest in the history of the revolutionary and civil wars. On one of our trips to Savannah, we of course took one of the commercially offered tours of the cemetery – our guide was actually very interesting, describing the symbolism built into the grave monuments and talking about the lives some of the people interred there. Also, she repeated the same story about Corinne’s suicide – so you have my full attention on the true story.

    • ruthrawls Says:

      Thanks for stumbling here! Are you a southern Lawton or a Northern Lawton?

      • Gregory Lawton Says:

        From the north – I’m not related to the Lawton family of Savannah as far as I know. My grandfather was born in England and emigrated to the US through Canada in the early 1900s, coming over with his older brother, who was an officer in the Salvation Army. The family eventually settled in Wisconsin.

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