From Washington to Columbia

Most of the way from Washington, Georgia, to Columbia, South Carolina, is two-lane. We decided to pull over to reinspect the map, and luckily, there was a handy pull-over spot.

In front of a church.

With historical markers.

IMG_5192

IMG_5193

Smyrna Methodist

Church

     ORGANIZED IN 1785 OR 86 BY

TWO PRESBYTERIAN MINISTERS REV.

JOHN NEWTON & REV. JOHN SIMPSON.

FIRST HOUSE OF WORSHIP ERECTED

IN 1793 ON LAND GIVEN BY SIR JOHN

TALBOT IN 1820 PRESBYTERIAN MEM-

BERSHIP TRANSFERRED TO WASHING-

TON AND OFFERED SMYRNA TO THE

METHODISTS.  REGULAR CHURCH

SERVICES HAVE BEEN HELD ON THIS

SITE WITHOUT INTERRUPTION SINCE 1793.

IMG_5194

SMYRNA CHURCH

Smyrna Church was organized about 1786, by the Rev. John Newton

and the Rev. John Simpson, Presbyterian ministers under the

jurisdiction of the South Carolina Presbytery.  Services were

at first held in the homes of the members.  The first Smyrna

church edifice, built on this site in 1793, was of logs, with

a steeple.  The first regular pastor was the Rev. John Springer,

who preached here until 1801.  About 1820, the church membership

decline to fifteen, and these removed to Washington to affiliate

with the Washington Presbyterian Church.

At this time, the Smyrna Presbyterians, through their elders,

tenered the use of the church edifice to the Methodists, who

accepted and soon established a flourishing Methodist Society

here.  The old church was in use until 1860, when it was torn

down and a new building erected.  On October 6, 1886, the title

to Smyrna Church was passed from the Trustees of the Washington

Presbyterian Church to the Trustees of the Smyrna Methodist

Church.  In 1911, a new building was constructed, the third

Smyrna on this site.

In the 1840s, an encampment was prepared near the church, and

was used as a camp ground by both Presbyterians and Methodists.

 

IMG_5195

SMYRNA CHURCHYARD

This burying ground was laid out in 1788 when

Sir John Talbot gave two acres of his vast

estate for use as a Presbyterian Church and

churchyard.  Sir John was descended from the Earl

of Shrewsbury.  His own son, Matthew Talbot, served

as a Superior Court judge, President of the

Georgia Senate in 1811, 1817-22, and as Governor

of Georgia from Oct. 24 to Nov. 5, 1819.  Both

are buried here.

W.H.T. Walker, Confederate General killed in the

Battle of Atlanta, was a descendant of Sir John

Talbot.

The Presbyterians moved to a new building in

Washington in 1825.

IMG_5196

And taking photos of both sides of the markers, even though they are identical, shows interesting details of the landscape, like how near the highway is, or the foliage.

Or Sugar sitting in the car, pushing food in his face.

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3 Responses to “From Washington to Columbia”

  1. Carol English Says:

    Hi — wondering what town in Ga this is in? I’ve googled and get a ton of non matching results. Thanks so much! Carol

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